Why ERA is Important to Me

2021 could be the year that women’s rights are secured in the U.S. Constitution – just 245 years after white men. The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is positioned to be the 28th amendment once either the Senate removes the deadline from the 1972 resolution OR the Department of Justice instructs the US Archivist to add it. The threshold of 38 states ratifying it happened in 2020 but it has been held up due to some technicalities. YOU can help promote awareness and action on the ERA. 

Would you like to tell Congress why the ERA is important to you? Here's how: Take a selfie, then add your picture and story in the textbox. You can also make a video and send in the url (just add the link in the textbox).   Your story can be up to 500 words.   If you need more words, just continue with additional posts.

 

Please include your Country of Residence, and Voting State at the end of your story.  Including your Name is optional.

We'll share these stories with Congressional allies to help them in their fight to finally add the ERA to the US Constitution. 
Please note that the stories below are all user submitted and reflect individual opinions. By sharing your story here you are consenting to sharing your story publicly both on this site and with Congress. 

Click here to read the first set of over 100 stories sent on March 25 to the Senate.

Click the textbox to share your story


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Now Is The Time

The Equal Rights Amendment will be an exceptional addition to the Constitution allowing women the freedom to express their voices fully and be equally involved in the matters that are important in society. I always remember getting my US Citizenship for the first time in 2008 and moving to Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. My Nana and I drove out to the voting site and it was at that moment when I first voted in the United States of America. It was such an empowering moment for me to be able to do so, and now it's wonderful to be able to vote from abroad. Tina Andres: New Mexico State voter, living in Canada.

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ERA is common-sense legislation

The ERA is the kind of common-sense legislation that anyone who believes in the promise of the Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights should support fervently. As a child when I learned about it I was astonished that it wouldn’t pass unanimously in every state and district. To me the feminist movement like other civil rights causes are about human rights and the principles of the Enlightenment that guide our laws. We must all fight to support rights and protections for all people regardless of their race, class, gender, orientation, or religion. That is who we are as Americans. I was blessed with strong female role models in my family who were academics, scientists, and leaders. I saw the way they have struggled in their life and careers to have the same compensation, respect, and recognition for their achievements which often required sacrifices well beyond what would be expected of men in similar professions. I strongly support the ratification of the Equal Rights Amendment and I will commit to fight for its passage by getting out the vote in elections and raising awareness for these issues in Georgia. Greg Dolezal, Democrats Abroad Viet Nam, Votes in GA

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Bring America up to par

We need the era to bring america up to par with international standards of equity, infant mortality, sanity! This goes thru ratifying the era.  Dan, live in Israel, vote in Georgia

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The government needs to hold us all accountable until we begin to do it ourselves

If we lived in a perfect world, we would all be treated equally despite our genders. We are not anywhere close to living in that world, and we have an overwhelming amount of data to support that. This is why we need the government to protect us with the ERA and hold corporations accountable until they do. I am an Iowa voter living in Colombia.

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