Int. Secretary (interim); Global Black Caucus Chair; DPCA Voting Rep, Switzerland

Unity through diverse & inclusive Leadership!

My grandmother once said to me: Always hear others out and remain open-minded; the day you think you know everything, is the day, you have the most, yet, to learn.  

How would I describe myself:

(GER): Angenehm Anders Als Alle Anderen (Pleasantly Different Than Everyone Else)

My name is Leedonal Moore and I also go by the name Jazzmin Dian Moore and although I’m from Mississippi, I'm a Texas State Voter.

I identify as non-binary and I recently celebrated my 40th Birthday in loving company with my Swiss partner and our 12 year old black labrador.

I am fluent in German & English and decent in eight other languages, including Sign-Language.

My passion is fencing, horse riding, cooking and bringing people closer together.

Constantly being internationally relocated, due to growing up in a military household, I learned early on of the importance of staying open minded, adapting fast to new and sometimes very stressful situations and equally staying connected to my bi-racial heritage and upbringing. 

Democrats Abroad is the community where I feel at home, where I can be who I am and where I can help others register to vote and help execute publishing different deadlines for each state so that people can properly exercise their fundamental voting rights.

It's been my greatest honor representing Democrats Abroad Switzerland on various news outlets during the 2020 elections.

I’ve been living in Zürich Switzerland for more than 16 years and since most recently also in France, where I am engulfed in the hospitality industry as a Château-Hotelier. 

I love to travel and I love to learn about different cultures. I am particularly sensitive to making sure that I properly represent the USA as a mix of many cultures and nationalities and I focus on making sure to not expect that other countries adapt to the “AMERICAN WAY”.

Today I work as a Diversity, Equity & Inclusion consultant for corporations, schools and embassies, as a TV & Radio host and event planer. And zes, i love wearing many hats. 

Initially my professional background started off in the beauty industry. While I have a Masters degree in Hair & Make Up and Communication, I worked from 2005 - 2015 as the Art Director & General Manager of a beauty company in Zürich. Hence, i have the ability to have a complete overview of all functions of a business (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, Marketing, Communication, Production, Quality, Engineering, Health & Safety, HR, Finance, IT, Logistics & Distribution, Sales & Customer Service) while focusing on both, the clients and employees.

In addition I started early on in investing my time and passion in strengthening marginalized communities, especially the Black and LGBTIQ+ Community.

For my engagements I’ve received various national and international awards such as the Miss Drag Queen Switzerland 2008 title, European TOLERANTIA Award 2016 and an honorary medal for my outstanding work & activism representing Americans living abroad 2016.

If there is one thing we have learned from the past horrible administration, it's that our greatest power is to listen, trust in facts & science, invest in diversity, equity & inclusion, cast our votes and lead by example.

And During a private dinner with one of our former Ambassadors they pointed out that my greatest potential is connecting people of all ethnicities, genders, faiths, sexual orientations - encouraging them to respect, uplift and help each other in leading by example.

I believe:

  • Healthcare is a right, not a privilege
  • Black Lives Matter ✊🏿✊🏾✊🏽
  • Public Education is a Public Good 🎒📚
  • A Fair Wage is a Living Wage
  • Women's Rights are Human Rights ♀️
  • Love is Love 🏳️‍🌈
  • No Human is Illegal
  • Science is Real 🔬
  • Voting Rights are Sacred 🗳️

Dear reader, I'm asking you: How can I help?

Love & Light

Leedonal / Jazzmin

 

 

     

 


  • published Happy Black History Month 2023 in News 2023-02-02 03:54:03 -0500

    Happy Black History Month 2023

    Happy Black History Month 2023

    2023 Black History Month theme provided by the Global Black Caucus: Black Resistance in The Past, Present, and Future.

    Black history is a living and breathing story of struggle and overcoming. It is both ancient and in process now. It is the summation and multiplication of Black people’s capacity for innovation and the will to survive and thrive in the face of relentless violence against our humanity.

    Placing Black history in this context of past and present affirms that it does not begin with slavery (as this country is wanton to do all too often). This point of departure is also a reminder that history should not be merely relegated to the past, but that in this very moment, we are making history in a way that will impact the kind of future we will have together.

    We invite you to have conversations and share the knowledge! Gather with your family and friends, brothers and sisters, allies, or even with the stranger sitting next to you on a bench.

    Here are a few Questions for Discussion and Reflection:

    • What connections can be made between earlier black freedom movements and the current protests? 
    • What sets the current protests apart from previous examples?
    • What strategies and theories of change have African American activists supported historically? How do these compare to the current protest demands?
    • How have local, state, and federal government responses to protests affected the movement for social change? What lessons can be applied to the current official responses?
    • What can the history of policing black Americans teach us about gender/class/racial/ethnic stereotypes in American society?
    • What role do community organizing and mass protest play in pressuring government/society to affect change?
    • What is the role of youth in the current protests? How does that compare to past movements?
    • Using examples from the past, what methods can historians and the general public use to preserve the history of the current protests and make them available to the public?


    #BlackHistoryMonth #BlackResistance #BlackLivesMatter #RepresentationMatters #BlackVotesMatter #VoteFromAbroad #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus #Reparations



     


  • published Join Us & Black Out Social Media in News 2023-01-31 18:55:40 -0500

    Join Us & Black Out Social Media

     

    This Black History Month the Global Black Caucus is Black Resistance in The Past, Present, and Future.

    An attack on our African-American Community is an attack on all Americans…

    The fight is far from over.
    When we look at the cumulative effect of what’s going on with our voting rights - the cumulative effect of the rise of white supremacists coming into black areas trying to intimidate - the cumulative effect of states who are putting forth more and more voter suppression laws.

    The fight is not over. It’s far from over!

    We are dedicated even more to fighting harder. Being demoralized is not an option!

    We are talking about our liberty, our freedom! Not just for us and our children but for all Americans.

    We demand fair treatment!
    We demand reparations!
    We demand fair education!
    We demand fair healthcare!
    We demand Fair elections!
    We demand equality and justice for ALL!

    We hope you will join us in posting a black picture for 24hrs with the following suggested text and yes, please encourage your families, friends, brothers, sisters & allies to follow your lead.

     




    #BHM #BlackHistoryMonth #BlackResistance#VotingRights #InequalityIsReal #LookUp#BlackVotesMatter #BlackLivesMatter#DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus#VoteFromAbroad #Reparations


  • published Black History Month Films in Black History Month 2023-01-31 04:50:53 -0500

    Black History Month Feature Films

    Black History Month Feature Films (Will be regularly updated.)

    The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman (1974)  The story of a black woman in the South who was born into slavery in the 1850s and lives to become a part of the civil rights movement in the 1960s.

    42 (2013) The story of Jackie Robinson who broke the color barrier in Major League Baseball. Available on Amazon Video, iTunes.

    Remember the Titans (2000) Based on a true story, in 1971, a court order forces three high schools in Alexandria, Virginia (two white, one African-American), to integrate their student bodies and faculties for the first time. Denzel Washington stars as the coach of a newly integrated football team in Virginia. A high school football coach finds himself fighting for stakes much higher than the State Championship in this drama based on actual events.  Available on iTunes.

    Glory (1989) The film is about one of the first military units of the Union Army, during the American Civil War, to consist entirely of African-American men (except for its officers), as told from the point of view of Colonel Shaw, its white commanding officer. The regiment is known especially for its heroic actions at Fort Wagner. Available on Amazon Video and  iTunes.

    Adam Clayton Powell (1989) The film delves into the gripping life and career of the most influential and flamboyant civil rights leader in America in the '30s, '40s and '50s. Narrated by civil rights activist Julian Bond and resplendent with rich archival footage and candid interviews with those who knew him best, this tell-all documentary mines the good, bad, and ugly acts of Powell's illustrious but controversial career - the multiple marriages, the uproarious taunting of the white establishment, his desegregation of Congress, and his shameful smearing of Martin Luther King, Jr. from self-imposed exile on the island of Bimini.Available on Amazon Video and  iTunes.

    Malcolm X (1992) Spike Lee’s Malcolm X stars Denzel Washington as one of black history’s most revolutionary leaders. This famous biopic chronicles the activist’s life up until his assassination in 1965.

    Race (2016) Race is a biopic film about Jesse Owens, the famed track and field athlete who endured racial discrimination and adversity on his way to winning 4 gold medals at the 1936 Olympics in Nazi Germany, a record that remained unbroken for 48 years. Despite his victory, Owens couldn’t even sit in the front of a bus when he returned home to the US.

    Girlhood (2014) Selected to open the 2014 Cannes Film Festival Directors’ Fortnight, this French film depicts a young girl’s coming of age and provides a fresh look into growing up black and poor in a Paris housing project. Girlhood reminds viewers that girls’ and women’s empowerment is a universal issue.

    Dear White People (2014) Dear White People tells the story of a group of black college students who grapple with issues of race, sexual orientation, and what it’s like to not fit in at a predominantly white university. The film, which won the Jury Prize at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival, brings much needed attention to racial tension that exist on college campuses in the 21st century.

    The Secret Life of Bees (2008) Based on the best-selling novel by Sue Monk Kidd, the film follows 14-year-old Lily Owens (Dakota Fanning) as she runs away from her abusive father with her caregiver (Jennifer Hudson). The pair is taken in by the Boatwright sisters (Queen Latifah, Alicia Keys, and Sophie Okonedo), who are more connected to Lily’s past than it might appear.

    The Pursuit of Happyness (2006) Also based on a true story, The Pursuit of Happyness follows single father Chris Gardner as he fights to survive after he and his son are evicted from their home right when he is set to begin an internship that has the potential to change both of their lives for the better.

    Fruitvale Station (2013) The film follows the last day in the life of Oscar Grant III (Michael B. Jordan), a 22-year-old Bay Area resident who was murdered by police on New Year’s Day 2009. By giving such a tight 24-hour look at Grant’s life, Fruitvale Station really forces audiences to see him as a whole person and not just another headline — an important message in a world where black men are murdered so often that people seem to become numb to the fact that they are human beings who have families, dreams, and fears just like everyone else.

    12 Years A Slave (2013) This film, directed by Steve McQueen, won three Academy Awards including Best Picture, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Supporting Actress. It is based on the memoir of Solomon Northup, a free man who, due to a tragic betrayal, was sold illegally into slavery in 1841. He lived out the next 12 years of his life on a plantation in Louisiana. This film chronicles his story.

    Moonlight (2016) Chiron, the protagonist, is played by three different actors throughout the film. His mother is an addict, he gets mercilessly bullied at school and his father is absent. This is not the recipe for a successful life. To add to that, the only role model he has is a drug dealer called Juan. With such an upbringing, Chiron inevitably ends up in a life of crime, but he has a secret that is ashamedly still taboo in the black community. Moonlight offers the other end of the spectrum so rarely captured in film of what goes on behind the tough exterior that comes with blackness and how vulnerability in a world that sees your race as subordinate is a dangerous thing.

    The Color Purple (1985)  What can we say about this 1980s classic that gave Oprah her Oscar and gave us one of Whoopie Goldberg’s most iconic roles. Based on a novel by Alice Walker, this is a must-watch whether you’ve seen it before or not. A black Southern woman struggles to find her identity after suffering abuse from her father and others over four decades.

    What Happened, Miss Simone? (2015)  Nina Simone is one of the most famous voices of a generation, but many today don’t know that she was also a vocal black rights and women’s rights activist. Living life out loud, Simone was incredible, and her life was fascinating.

    Hidden Figures (2016) The true story of the black women who helped propel America into the space race.

    Marshall (2017) Based on a true story, MARSHALL follows future Supreme Court Justice, Thurgood Marshall, as he defends a black man from sexual assault charges against his white employer.

    Selma (2014) A chronicle of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s campaign to secure equal voting rights via an epic march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965.

    4 Little Girls (1997) A documentary of the notorious racial terrorist bombing of an African American church during the Civil Rights Movement.

    Amistad (1997) In 1839, the revolt of Mende captives aboard a Spanish owned ship causes a major controversy in the United States when the ship is captured off the coast of Long Island. The courts must decide whether the Mende are slaves or legally free.


  • Black History Month Documentaries

    Black History Month Documentaries

     

    The PBS Series: The African Americans Many Rivers to Cross

    This series chronicles the full sweep of African American history, from the origins of slavery on the African continent right up to today when America has a black president, yet remains a nation deeply divided by race.      

    Episode 1: The Black Atlantic (1500-1800)

    Episode 2: The Age of Slavery (1800 -1860)

    Episode 3: Into the Fire (1861-1896)

    Episode 4: Making a way Out of no way (1897-1940)

    Episode 5: Rise! (1940 - 1968)

    Episode 6: A More Perfect Union (1968 - 2013)

    The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 For three decades, the film canisters sat undisturbed in a cellar beneath the Swedish National Broadcasting Company. Inside was roll after roll of startlingly fresh and candid 16mm footage shot in the 1960s and 1970s in the United States, all of it focused on the anti-war and Black Power movements. When filmmaker Goran Hugo Olsson discovered the footage, he decided he had a responsibility to shepherd this glimpse of history into the world. With contemporary audio interviews from leading African American artists, activists, musicians and scholars, The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 looks at the people, society, culture, and style that fueled an era of convulsive change. Utilizing an innovative format that riffs on the popular 1970s mixtape format, Mixtape is a cinematic and musical journey into the black communities of America.

    13TH: A Netflix Original In this thought-provoking documentary, scholars, activists and politicians analyze the criminalization of African Americans and the U.S. prison boom. Available on Netflix

    Eyes on the Prize II: America at the Racial Crossroads 1965–1985

    Season 2, Episode 1:The Time Has Come: 1964-1966  Episode focuses on black militancy and the roots of the black power movement. Also tracks the influence of ideas of black separatism and black nationalism on a new generation of blacks and analyzes the long-term impact they had on whites who supported the freedom movement.

    Season 2, Episode 2: Two Societies: 1965-1968  Northern cities served as the backdrop for confrontations on a scale the civil rights movement had never seen before the mid-1960s. Scarred by widespread discrimination, black inner-city neighborhoods became sites of crumbling houses, poverty, and street violence. Although the black-led movement for social change and equality in the North had a long history, it had not received the same media attention the struggle in the South had.

    Season 2, Episode 3: Power!: 1966-1968 Exploring the influence of the idea of black power on freedom movement. Follows leaders of three black communities in their efforts to gain political and economic power that would enable advancements in employment, housing and education.

    Season 2, Episode 4: The Promised Land: 1967-1968 Martin Luther King, Jr. stakes out new ground for himself and the rapidly fragmenting civil rights movement. He is assassinated in Memphis at the Lorraine Motel.

    Season 2, Episode 5: Ain't Gonna Shuffle No More: 1964-1972 Call to pride and push for unity galvanize blacks. Cassius Clay challenges America to accept him as Muhammad Ali, who refuses to fight in Vietnam. Students at Howard University fight to bring the growing black consciousness movement and their African heritage inside the walls of the institution.

    Season 2, Episode 6: A Nation of Law?: 1968-1971 Black activism is increasingly met with violent and unethical response from local and federal law enforcement. A five-day inmate takeover at Attica Prison calls the public's attention to conditions there leaves 43 dead: 39 killed by police.

    Season 2, Episode 7: The Keys to the Kingdom: 1974-1980 In the 1970s, anti-discrimination rights are put to the test. Boston whites violently resist federal school desegregation order. Atlanta's mayor Jackson proves affirmative action can work, but Bakke decision challenges that policy.

    Season 2, Episode 8: Back to the Movement: 1979-Mid 1980s Episode explores new and old challenges that black communities faced 25 years after civil rights struggle began. It follows black communities in Miami and Chicago and chronicles their dramatically different responses to these challenges.

    The Long Walk of Nelson Mandela This 2-hour PBS FRONTLINE documentary covers Nelson Mandela's amazing life story, from his radical political activism in Johannesburg as a youth to his over 20-year imprisonment, and then to his remarkable rise as the President of South Africa from 1994 to 1999 in which he presided over the dismantling of apartheid. This documentary features excellent footage from all periods in Mandela's life along with interviews of the people closest to him. It's a story that must be heard to be believed.

    For Love of Liberty: The Story of America’s Black Patriots A two-part, four-hour documentary series honoring African-American servicemen and women.

    The Trials of Muhammad Ali (2013) investigates its extraordinary and often complex subject's life outside the boxing ring. From joining the controversial Nation of Islam and changing his name from Cassius Clay to Muhammad Ali, to his refusal to serve in the Vietnam War in the name of protesting racial inequality, to his global humanitarian work, Muhammad Ali remains an inspiring and controversial figure. Outspoken and passionate in his beliefs, Ali found himself in the center of America's controversies over race, religion, and war. Available on Amazon Video and  iTunes.

    Black America Since MLK:And Still I Rise parts 1-4 Henry Louis Gates, Jr. embarks on a deeply personal journey through the last fifty years of African American history. Joined by leading scholars, celebrities, and a dynamic cast of people who shaped these years, Gates travels from the victories of the civil rights movement up to today, asking profound questions about the state of black America—and our nation as a whole.

    Parts 1 & 2 Parts 3 & 4


  • Black History Month Children's Books

    Children's Books for Black History Month

    (Will be regularly updated.)

     

    Happy Hair

    By Mechal Renee Roe

    Published: Feb 11, 2020, // ISBN 9781984895578 // 3-7 years

    Happy Hair is a call-and-response book that promotes positive self-esteem and hair love to girls of all ages! Happy Hair covers different shades and hair types all while being fun and fashionable! This book is the foundation to building Happy Hair.

     

     

    Cool Cuts

    By Mechal Renee Roe

    Format: 34 pages, Hardcover

    Published: May 19, 2014 // ISBN: 9780991621118 // 3-7 years

    Mechal Renee Roe, illustrator of Vice President Kamala Harris’s Super Heroes Are Everywhere, creates a joyful, positive, read-together book celebrating boys with natural black hair that will have kids everywhere chanting: “I am born to be awesome!”

    When the stars shine, the world is mine! I am born to be awesome! My hair is free, just like me! I am born to be awesome! 

    Boys will love seeing strong, happy reflections of themselves in this vibrant, rhythmic book full of hip Black hairstyles. From a ‘fro-hawk to mini-twists and crisp cornrows, adorable illustrations of boys with cool curls, waves, and afros grace each page, accompanied by a positive message that will make kids cheer. It’s a great read-aloud to promote positive self-esteem to boys of all ages, building and growing the foundation of self-love (and hair love!) and letting every boy know that “You are born to be awesome!”

    Standing in the Need of Prayer

    By Carole Boston Weatherford

    Illustrated by Frank Morrison

    Published: Sep 20, 2022  // ISBN 9780593306345 // 6-9 years

    From an award-winning author and critically acclaimed artist comes a stunning and deeply moving picture book based on the popular spiritual. The classic lyrics have been reworked to chronicle the milestones, struggles, tragedies, and triumphs of African American history. A perfect gift or timeless keepsake!

    This inspirational book encapsulates African American history and invites conversations at all levels. Carole Boston Weatherford’s riveting text and Frank Morrison’s evocative and detailed paintings are informative reminders of yesterday, hopeful images for today, and aspirational dreams of tomorrow.

    Stretching more than four hundred years, this book features pivotal moments in history, such as the arrival of enslaved people in Jamestown, Virginia, in 1619; Nat Turner’s rebellion; the integration of the US military; the Selma to Montgomery marches; and peaceful present-day protests. It also celebrates the feats of African American musicians and athletes, such as Duke Ellington and Florence Griffith Joyner.

    Visually stunning and incredibly timely, this book reckons with a painful history while serving as a testament to the human spirit’s ability to persevere in even the most hopeless of circumstances. Its universal message of faith, strength, and resilience will resonate with readers of all ages.

    The Green Piano

    By Roberta Flack and Tonya Bolden

    Illustrated by Hayden Goodman

    Published: Jan 10, 2023 // ISBN 9780593479872 // 4-8 years 

    This autobiographical picture book by the multiple Grammy Award-winning singer Roberta Flack recounts her childhood in a home surrounded by music and love: it all started with a beat-up piano that her father found in a junkyard, repaired, and painted green.

    Growing up in a Blue Ridge mountain town, little Roberta didn’t have fancy clothes or expensive toys…but she did have music. And she dreamed of having her own piano.

    When her daddy spies an old, beat-up upright piano in a junkyard, he knows he can make his daughter’s dream come true. He brings it home, cleans and tunes it, and paints it a grassy green. And soon the little girl has an instrument to practice on, and a new dream to reach for–one that will make her become a legend in the music industry.

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    Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    By: Doreen Rappaport

    Illustrated by: Bryan Collier

    Genre: Nonfiction, Biography

    Age Level: 6-9

    Reading Level: Beginning Reader

    Martin Luther King Jr. grew up fascinated by big words. He would later go on to use these words to inspire a nation and call people to action. In this award-winning book, powerful portraits of King show how he used words, not weapons, to fight injustice.

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    Through My Eyes

    By: Ruby Bridges

    Genre: Nonfiction, Biography

    Age Level: 9-12

    Reading Level: Independent Reader

    Six-year-old Ruby Bridges became the first African American to integrate an elementary school. Her memories of that year, when so much hatred was directed at her, make for a powerful memoir. A 1999 Parents' Choice Gold Award Winner.

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    Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer

    By: Carole Boston Weatherford

    Illustrated by: Ekua Holmes

    Genre: Nonfiction, Biography, Poetry

    Age Level: 9-12

    Reading Level: Independent Reader

    Stirring poems and vibrant collage illustrations combine to celebrate the life of Fannie Lou Hamer, a champion of the Civil Rights and voting rights movements from the 1950s through the 1970s. Born in the Mississippi delta, the youngest of 20 children, Hamer had to drop out of school after sixth grade to work in the cotton fields before she became a powerful voice for her people. The book vividly brings to life Hamer’s legacy with a message of hope, determination, and strength.

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    The Dream Keeper and Other Poems

    By: Langston Hughes

    Illustrated by: Brian Pinkney

    Genre: Poetry

    Age Level: 6-9

    Reading Level: Independent Reader

    The great American poet Langston Hughes chose the poems in this classic collection, originally published for young people in 1932.

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    Sweet Clara and the Freedom Quilt

    By: Deborah Hopkinson

    Illustrated by: James Ransome

    Genre: Fiction, Historical Fiction

    Age Level: 6-9

    Reading Level: Independent Reader

    Clara is born into slavery but learns an important skill when she becomes a seamstress. Her quilting ability allows Clara to put together directions to escape north to freedom when she overhears a conversation about a route to Canada.

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    Two Friends

    by Dean Robbins

    Illustrated by Selina Alko, Sean Qualls

    Ages Level: 7-10

    Genre: Historical Fiction

    Some people had rights, while others had none. Why shouldn't they have them, too?Two friends, Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass, get together for tea and conversation. They recount their similar stories fighting to win rights for women and African Americans. The premise of this particular exchange between the two is based on a statue in their hometown of Rochester, New York, which shows the two friends having tea.The text by award-winning writer Dean Robbins teaches about the fight for women's and African Americans' rights in an accessible, engaging manner for young children.

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    Minty: A Story Of Young Harriet Tubman

    by Alan Schroeder

    Illustrated by Jerry Pinkney

    Age Level: 5-7

    Genre: Biography and Autobiography

    Many people know about Harriet Tubman's adult life — how she helped hundreds of slaves escape to freedom along the Underground Railroad. But how many know about Harriet Tubman's life as a child on the Brodas plantation in the late 1820s? As a young slave, nicknamed "Minty," Harriet Tubman was a feisty and stubborn girl with a dream of escape, and whose rebellious spirit often got her into trouble. Pinkney's expressive illustrations bring every emotion to brilliant life — from troubled sorrow to spirited hope for freedom.

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    Dad, Jackie, And Me

    by Myron Uhlberg

    Illustrated by Colin Bootman

    Age Level: 8-10

    Genre:Historical Fiction

    An inspiring and sentimental tale of one famous summer in Brooklyn in 1947. It is the summer of 1947 and a highly-charged baseball season is underway in New York. Jackie Robinson is the new first baseman for the Brooklyn Dodgers — and the first black player in major league baseball. A young boy shares the excitement of Robinson's rookie season with his deaf father. Each day he listens eagerly to the Brooklyn Dodgers games on the radio. When his father arrives home from work, the boy uses sign language to tell him about the Dodgers. His father begins to keep a scrapbook, clipping photos and articles about Jackie. Finally one day the father delivers some big news: they are going to Ebbets Field to watch Jackie play in person!

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    What Color Is My World?: The Lost History of African-American Inventors

    By Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Raymond Obstfeld

    Recommended ages: 8 and up

    Did you know that African-American inventors had a hand in everything from the ice-cream scoop and the refrigerated food truck to cortisone cream and open-heart surgery? In this book co-authored by NBA star Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, kids can learn about the great minds behind important inventions, product improvements, and scientific and medical discoveries that we take for granted.


  • published Black History Month Books in Black History Month 2023-01-31 04:52:04 -0500

    Black History Month Books

    Books for Black History Month

    (Will be regularly updated.)

    The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism by Edward E. Baptist

    Paperback: 560 pages

    Publisher: Basic Books; Reprint edition (October 25, 2016)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0465049664

    ISBN-13: 978-0465049660

    Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution--the nation's original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America's later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward E. Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback and Audiobook

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    Destined to Witness: Growing Up Black in Nazi Germany by Hans J. Massaquoi

    Paperback: 480 pages

    Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (February 6, 2001)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0060959614

    ISBN-13: 978-0060959616

    An astonishing true tale of how he came of age as a black child in Nazi Germany. The son of a prominent African and a German nurse, Hans remained behind with his mother when Hitler came to power, due to concerns about his fragile health, after his father returned to Liberia. Like other German boys, Hans went to school; like other German boys, he swiftly fell under the Fuhrer's spell. So he was crushed to learn that, as a black child, he was ineligible for the Hitler Youth. His path to secondary education and an eventual profession was blocked. He now lived in fear that, at any moment, he might hear the Gestapo banging on the door -- or Allied bombs falling on his home. Ironic,, moving, and deeply human, Massaquoi's account of this lonely struggle for survival brims with courage and intelligence.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    On the Pleasures of Owning Persons: The Hidden Face of American Slavery by Professor and Chair Volney Gay (Author)

    Publisher: Ipbooks; . ed. edition (July 31, 2016)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 099654819X

    ISBN-13: 978-0996548199

    The real reason Americans owned slaves was not just financial. They did it because they liked it. For the first two centuries of American history, starting with the colonists, slavery was a part of the social, economic, and governmental order. Looking back, many of us find it more comfortable to view slave owners as evil or sociopathic. The startling truth is that many were otherwise admirable.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, and Paperback

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    The Black Presidency: Barack Obama and the Politics of Race in America by Michael Eric Dyson

    Hardcover: 368 pages

    Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1 edition (February 2, 2016)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 054438766X

    ISBN-13: 978-0544387669

    Michael Eric Dyson explores the powerful, surprising way the politics of race have shaped Barack Obama’s identity and groundbreaking presidency. How has President Obama dealt publicly with race—as the national traumas of Tamir Rice, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Freddie Gray, and Walter Scott have played out during his tenure? What can we learn from Obama's major race speeches about his approach to racial conflict and the black criticism it provokes?

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback and Audiobook

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    The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin (1963)

    Hardcover: 192 pages

    Publisher: HOLT, RINEHART AND WINSTON; 1 edition (October 17, 2000)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 003055442X

    ISBN-13: 978-0030554421

    We are living through something of a Baldwin renaissance, in large part thanks to Raoul Peck’s brilliant documentary I Am Not Your Negro. Any number of Baldwin’s books might earn a place on this list, but The Fire Next Time stands out. Consisting of two essays, one addressed to Baldwin’s nephew, it is a passionate and visceral plea to black and white America. It is the only document I know of that expresses the civil rights case as eloquently as the speeches of Martin Luther King.

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    Discourse on Colonialism by Aimé Césaire (1950)

    Paperback: 102 pages

    Publisher: Monthly Review Press (2001)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 1583670254

    ISBN-13: 978-1583670255

    Published in 1955, when most of Africa was still the colonial possession of one or other of the European powers, Césaire’s masterwork argues that the European empires were, like all empires, run for the profit of the colonizing powers, rather than the benefit of the colonized peoples. More controversially, Césaire hypothesized that the roots of Nazism could be found in the toxic soil of imperialism.

    Available Formats: Paperback

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    The Black Atlantic by Paul Gilroy (1993)

    Paperback: 280 pages

    Publisher: Harvard University Press; Reissue edition (March 8, 1993)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0674076060

    ISBN-13: 978-0674076068

    It was in this book that Gilroy laid out his concept of the “Black Atlantic”, the idea that black culture is essentially a hybrid, a product of centuries of exchange, slavery, and movement across the Atlantic. Exploring everything from the lives and work of African American philosophers such as WEB DuBois, to black popular music, Gilroy demonstrates that black culture is both “local” and “global”, and cannot be constrained within any single national culture. It flows across the black Atlantic of the book’s title. The influence of Gilroy’s work can be felt not only in modern scholarship but even in the work of the visual artist John Akomfrah.

    Available Formats: Hardcover and Paperback

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    Roots by Alex Haley (1976)

    Hardcover: 704 pages

    Publisher: Wings; Reprint edition (September 5, 2000)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0517208601

    ISBN-13: 978-0517208601

    What turns a great book into a great political book is its impact, as much as its content. Both on the page and later on the television screen, Alex Haley’s masterpiece was a phenomenon. For African-Americans, whose familial links to Africa had been severed by slavery and racism, it was a revelation. Although Haley’s methodology has been criticized, the cultural impact of Roots remains undeniable.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, and Paperback

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    The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander (2010)

    Hardcover: 290 pages

    Publisher: The New Press; 1 edition (January 5, 2010)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 1595581030

    ISBN-13: 978-1595581037

    Lists of great books tend to focus on works that are old enough to have become firmly established as classics. Michelle Alexander’s book, published just seven years ago, earns its place and already seems prescient. Controversially and passionately, it exposes the crisis that is the mass incarceration of African-American men in post-civil rights America.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    The History of White People by Nell Irvin Painter (2010)

    Hardcover: 512 pages

    Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (March 15, 2010)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0393049345

    ISBN-13: 978-0393049343

    I’m sometimes nervous about books that use the phrase “white people” as if all “white people” or all “black people” can be categorized as being a single group. But Painter’s book is a clever history of the idea of “whiteness”. It demonstrates that a number of ethnic groups, whom we today automatically regard as being “white”, were once regarded as being outside of the white race.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    Race Matters by Cornel West (1993)

    Hardcover: 128 pages

    Publisher: Beacon Press; Anniversary edition (December 5, 2017)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 080704122X

    ISBN-13: 978-0807041222

    Race Matters is to be re-issued later this year to mark its forthcoming 25th anniversary. The timing is grimly pertinent. Across a series of interweaving essays, West argues that racism is so much a part of American history and culture that it can only be addressed and confronted if that reality is confronted – and by Americans of all races.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain by Peter Fryer (1984)

    Paperback: 648 pages

    Publisher: Pluto Press; 2 edition (November 6, 2010)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 074533072X

    ISBN-13: 978-0745330723

    In June 1948, Peter Fryer, then a young reporter, was dispatched to Tilbury docks to report on the arrival of the Empire Windrush and the 492 West Indian migrants on board. That led, 36 years later, to the publication of Staying Power. At a time when little on the subject was written, Fryer created an encyclopedic panorama of the black presence in Britain.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, and Paperback

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    The Autobiography of Malcolm X by Alex Haley (1976)

    Hardcover: 528 pages

    Publisher: Ballantine Books; Reissue edition (September 29, 1992)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0345379756

    ISBN-13: 978-0345379757

    Co-authored by Alex Haley and based on a series of interviews with Malcolm X, this is one of the greatest biographies of the last century. Through his own life story and that of the key figures of his troubled years in the underworld of New York, Malcolm bore witness to the racism of the 1930s and 40s. It’s impossible to believe he would occupy the cultural position he holds today had the book never been written.

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    Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela (1994)

    Hardcover: 507 pages

    Publisher: HOLT, RINEHART, AND WINSTON; 1 edition (September 22, 2000)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0030565812

    ISBN-13: 978-0030565816

    I was in Tanzania when the news of Mandela’s death was announced. I rushed out and bought the only copy of Mandela’s 1994 biography I could find in the book shops of Dar es Salaam – others had evidently felt the same urge to re-read the book. If apartheid was the most perfected and methodically applied system of racial oppression ever devised the Long Walk to Freedom is the ultimate denouncement of it. It is a statement of the obvious that Mandela was one of the great figures of our age. To fully understand how great you have to read his account of the infamous Rivonia trial.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, and Paperback

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    Look for Me in the Whirlwind: From the Panther 21 to 21st-Century Revolutions by Dhoruba Bin Wahad,‎ Jamal Joseph,‎ Sekou Odinga

    Paperback: 648 pages

    Publisher: PM Press (August 15, 2017)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 1629633895

    ISBN-13: 978-1629633893

    In 1969, 21 members of the militant New York branch of the Black Panther Party were rounded up and indicted on multiple charges of violent acts and conspiracies. The membership of the NY 21, which includes the mother of Tupac Shakur, is largely forgotten and unknown. Their legacy, however—reflected upon here in this special edition—provides essential truths which have remained largely hidden.

    Available Formats: Kindle and Paperback

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    Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America by Peniel E. Joseph

    Paperback: 432 pages

    Publisher: Holt Paperbacks; Reprint edition (July 10, 2007)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0805083359

    ISBN-13: 978-0805083354

    Was the black power movement part of the civil rights movement, or something separate? Joseph, a leading figure in the new black power studies, makes the case for its singularity in the most comprehensive overview of the topic published to date. Rather than seeing black power as a series of unconnected iconic episodes and images – Black Panthers toting guns, the clenched fist salutes at the 1968 Olympics, Angela Davis's loud and proud Afro–Joseph presents a picture of a coherent movement with its own distinct politics and sensibilities.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    The Black Jacobins: Toussaint L'Ouverture and the San Domingo Revolution by C.L.R. James

    Paperback: 448 pages

    Publisher: Vintage; 2 edition (October 23, 1989)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0679724672

    ISBN-13: 978-0679724674

    This powerful, intensely dramatic book is the definitive account of the Haitian Revolution of 1794-1803, a revolution that began in the wake of the Bastille but became the model for the Third World liberation movements from Africa to Cuba. It is the story of the French colony of San Domingo, a place where the brutality of masters toward slaves was commonplace and ingeniously refined. And it is the story of a barely literate slave named Toussaint L'Ouverture, who led the black people of San Domingo in a successful struggle against successive invasions by overwhelming French, Spanish, and English forces and in the process helped form the first independent nation in the Caribbean.

    Available Formats: Hardcover and Paperback

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    Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times by Harriet A. Washington

    Paperback: 528 pages

    Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (January 8, 2008)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 076791547X

    ISBN-13: 978-0767915472

    Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.2 x 8.2 inches

    From the era of slavery to the present day, the first full history of black America’s shocking mistreatment as unwilling and unwitting experimental subjects at the hands of the medical establishment. Medical Apartheid is the first and only comprehensive history of medical experimentation on African Americans. Starting with the earliest encounters between black Americans and Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, it details the ways both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledge—a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It reveals how blacks have historically been prey to grave robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of blacks, and the view that they were biologically inferior, oversexed, and unfit for adult responsibilities. Shocking new details about the government’s notorious Tuskegee experiment are revealed, as are similar, less well-known medical atrocities conducted by the government, the armed forces, prisons, and private institutions.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America by Peniel E. Joseph

    Paperback: 432 pages

    Publisher: Holt Paperbacks; Reprint edition (July 10, 2007)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0805083359

    The Black Power movement is one of the most misunderstood movements in history. Decades of negative media coverage and stereotypes have contributed to that. Here Peniel Joseph dives in deep and shows where and how the Black Power movement diverged from and overlapped with other racial equality movements, from its inception with Stokely Carmichael at the helm to the rise of the Black Panther Party.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide (Paperback) – by Carol Anderson

    Paperback: 304 pages

    Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; Reprint edition (September 5, 2017)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 1632864134

    ISBN-13: 978-1632864130

    From the Civil War to our combustible present, White Rage reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America--now in paperback with a new afterword by the author, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    Assata: An Autobiography - by Assata Shakur

    Paperback: 320 pages

    Publisher: Lawrence Hill Books; unknown edition (November 1, 2001)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 1556520743

    ISBN-13: 978-1556520747

    On May 2, 1973, Black Panther Assata Shakur (aka JoAnne Chesimard) lay in a hospital, close to death, handcuffed to her bed, while local, state, and federal police attempted to question her about the shootout on the New Jersey Turnpike that had claimed the life of a white state trooper. Long a target of J. Edgar Hoover's campaign to defame, infiltrate, and criminalize Black nationalist organizations and their leaders, Shakur was incarcerated for four years prior to her conviction on flimsy evidence in 1977 as an accomplice to murder. This intensely personal and political autobiography belies the fearsome image of JoAnne Chesimard long projected by the media and the state. With wit and candor, Assata Shakur recounts the experiences that led her to a life of activism and portray the strengths, weaknesses and eventual demise of Black and White revolutionary groups at the hand of government officials. The result is a signal contribution to the literature about growing up Black in America that has already taken its place alongside "The Autobiography of Malcolm X" and the works of Maya Angelou. Two years after her conviction, Assata Shakur escaped from prison. She was given political asylum by Cuba, where she now resides."

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, and Paperback

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    The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson

    Paperback: 640 pages

    Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (October 4, 2011)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0679763880

    ISBN-13: 978-0679763888

    From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves. With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, George Starling, and Robert Foster. Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    Women, Race, & Class by Angela Y. Davis

    Paperback: 288 pages

    Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage Books edition (February 12, 1983)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0394713516

    ISBN-13: 978-0394713519

    A powerful study of the women's liberation movement in the U.S., from abolitionist days to the present, demonstrates how it has always been hampered by the racist and classist biases of its leaders. From the widely revered and legendary political activist and scholar Angela Davis.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, and Paperback

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    Blues Legacies and Black Feminism: Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday by Angela Y. Davis

    Paperback: 464 pages

    Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage Books Ed edition (January 26, 1999)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0679771263

    ISBN-13: 978-0679771265

    From one of this country's most important intellectuals comes a brilliant analysis of the blues tradition that examines the careers of three crucial black women blues singers through a feminist lens. Angela Davis provides the historical, social, and political contexts with which to reinterpret the performances and lyrics of Gertrude "Ma" Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday as powerful articulations of an alternative consciousness profoundly at odds with mainstream American culture.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, and Paperback

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    Sweet Tea: Black Gay Men of the South by E. Patrick Johnson

    Paperback: 592 pages

    Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 2 edition (September 1, 2011)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0807872261

    ISBN-13: 978-0807872260

    Giving voice to a population too rarely acknowledged, Sweet Tea collects more than sixty life stories from black gay men who were born, raised, and continue to live in the South. E. Patrick Johnson challenges stereotypes of the South as "backward" or "repressive" and offers a window into the ways black gay men negotiate their identities, build community, maintain friendship networks, and find sexual and life partners--often in spaces and activities that appear to be anti-gay. Ultimately, Sweet Tea validates the lives of these black gay men and reinforces the role of storytelling in both African American and southern cultures.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension Of American Racism by James W. Loewen

    Hardcover: 562 pages

    Publisher: New Press, The; 1st, First Printing edition (September 29, 2005)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 156584887X

    ISBN-13: 978-1565848870

    In this groundbreaking work, bestselling sociologist James W. Loewen, author of the national bestseller Lies My Teacher Told Me, brings to light decades of hidden racial exclusion in America. In a provocative, sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, Loewen uncovers the thousands of “sundown towns”—almost exclusively white towns where it was an unspoken rule that blacks could not live there—that cropped up throughout the twentieth century, most of them located outside of the South. These towns used everything from legal formalities to violence to create homogenous Caucasian communities—and their existence has gone unexamined until now. For the first time, Loewen takes a long, hard look at the history, sociology, and continued existence of these towns, contributing an essential new chapter to the study of American race relations.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook

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    God's Other Children - A London Memoir by Vernal W Scott

    Paperback: 606 pages

    Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (July 22, 2013)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 1482741172

    ISBN-13: 978-1482741179

    Black LGBTQ people have long been an integral part of black history. A crucial part of their more recent history has been captured in this essential non-fiction book, which has won rave reader reviews and recommendations by WH Smith and notables such as Peter Tatchell and Lord Paul Boateng. Born in early 1960s London to Jamaican parents, Vernal has written the only self-published title to be shortlisted for the 2014 Polari First Book Prize. Featuring text and photos over 600 pages, it is quite an astonishing account of Black culture and sexuality, ‘coming out’, the ‘AIDS war years’, gay fatherhood, politics, ‘damaging religion’, hate, love, and more.

    Available Formats: Kindle and Paperback

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    The Black Calhouns: From Civil War to Civil Rights with One African American Family by Gail Lumet Buckley

    Hardcover: 336 pages

    Publisher: Atlantic Monthly Press (February 2, 2016)

    Language: English

    ISBN-10: 0802124542

    ISBN-13: 978-0802124548

    In The Black Calhouns, Gail Lumet Buckley—daughter of actress Lena Horne—delves deep into her family history, detailing the experiences of an extraordinary African-American family from the Civil War to Civil Rights.

    Available Formats: Kindle, Hardcover, Paperback, and Audiobook


  • published Black History Month Events in Black History Month 2023-01-31 04:52:57 -0500

    Black History Month Events

    DA Black History Month Events

    (Will be regularly updated.)

     

    • GBC Events:

    The National Welfare Rights Organization 1966 - 1975

    An outgrowth of the Civil Rights Movement: Women of Color Rising to lift themselves and their children out of poverty.

    Join the Global Black Caucus for an insightful webinar, during Black History Month 2023, and learn more about the significance of the National Welfare Rights Organization and its activism and legacy which still carries on today.  

    February 11, 2023, at 10:00 AM EST / 16:00 PM CET / 23:00 HKT 

    RSVP HERE


    • GBC Supported Events:

     


    • GBC Cosponsored Events:


    A 21st-Century Economic Bill Of Rights

    How do we reverse increasing income inequality in the United States? A 21st-Century Economic Bill of Rights would guarantee all people residing in the United States the right to the essentials of a good life, regardless of their income, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or country of origin. Join our guest speakers to learn more about this progressive proposal and what we can do to implement it.

    Confirmed speakers:

    • Harvey J. Kaye: American historian and sociologist. Author of several books, including “Thomas Paine and the Promise of America” and “The Fight for the Four Freedoms.” He is a Professor Emeritus of Democracy & Justice Studies and the Director of the Center for History and Social Change at the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay.
    • Alan Minsky: Executive Director of the Progressive Democrats of America and a lifelong activist, who has worked as a progressive journalist, as Program Director at KPFK Los Angeles, and as coordinator for Pacifica Radio’s national coverage of elections. 

    RSVP HERE


  • published Black History Month 2023 in Black History Month 2023-01-31 04:53:24 -0500

    Black History Month 2023

    Thank you very much for visiting the Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus Black History Month 2023 Resources and Events page. 

    2023 Black History Month theme provided by the Global Black Caucus: Black Resistance in The Past, Present, and Future…

    Black history is a living and breathing story of struggle and overcoming. It is both ancient and in process now. It is the summation and multiplication of Black people’s capacity for innovation and the will to survive and thrive in the face of relentless violence against our humanity. 

    Our story is chronicled over thousands of years of Black existence—beginning with the bones of Dinknesh, the great Mousian library, and the civilizations of Mali, Songhai, Kush, and Aksum. It has been likewise expressed in the untold revolts by those who were enslaved, and Black people’s persistent march toward liberation and freedom.

    And, we are making history right now. The largest protest movement in the history of the world was birthed on these shores by our people who have declared that Black Lives Matter. Black people, and Black women in particular, saving the best prospects for democracy in the last election cycle is yet another testament to this fact.

    Placing Black history in this context of past and present affirms that it does not begin with slavery (as this country is wanton to do all too often). This point of departure is also a reminder that history should not be merely relegated to the past, but that in this very moment, we are making history in a way that will impact the kind of future we will have together.

    With this level-setting as a backdrop, I’d like to draw your attention to a set of questions that we've been reflecting on. They are questions that invite us to courageously reflect on our history, to be informed and intentional about the decisions before us today, and to embrace the idea that what we do now will impact the future we have together.

    Looking back at generations past, what if:

    • African civilizations never encountered European invaders and colonialism?
    • Black people actually received their 40 acres and a mule?
    • Slavery or Jim Crow never happened?
    • Race riots in places like Tulsa, Memphis, Atlanta, and Chicago never happened? FDR made stronger and more explicit provisions for Black folks in the New Deal?
    • The wars on crime and drugs—and the resulting rise of mass incarceration never happened?
    • There was a way to revitalize our neighborhoods without gentrifying them and displacing Black people?
    • The murders of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Medgar Evers, Emmitt Till, Sandra Bland, Breonna Taylor, Felycya Harris, Mia Green, George Floyd, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Trayvon Martin never happened—and they were still alive?

    Asking these questions in this way not only opens our imagination for what might have happened if people living during these times had chosen to do otherwise.  It also invites those of us who are living in the present to consider the critical choices that are before us now—what they will require of us, their impact, and how people 100 years from now will reflect on what we do in this present moment.  Given this, we are left to consider the ‘what ifs’ of our time. 

    What if we:

    • Became a democracy that leads with racial equity and racial justice?
    • Closed racial income and wealth gaps?
    • See poverty (particularly Black poverty) as a systemic and societal failure rather than an indictment on individuals?
    • Embrace a comprehensive reparations program for Black people that redresses America’s history of racism and allows us (and the entire nation) to heal?
    • Convened truth and reconciliation commissions at the national and local levels?
    • Design interlocking systems of education, health, civic participation, and economy that produce racial equity and racial justice?
    • Established a new paradigm for wealth-starting with Black wealth?
    • ALL Black lives really mattered?

    And yes we invite you to have the conversations and share the knowledge you gather here with your family and friends, brothers and sisters, allies, or even the stranger sitting next to you on a bench….

    We've put together lists of activities/events, books, films, and other information we hope you find interesting, inspiring, helpful, and educational. The resources on this page are intended to help you learn more about African-American History, and GBC issues and help you develop activities and events for your chapter or precinct. 

    The Black History Month 2023 Resources page will be regularly updated. 

    Where links are provided, they have only suggested sources. Please use the sources you are most comfortable with. 

    If you have any questions or ideas you would like us to include, please feel free to contact us at: [email protected]


  • rsvped for Film Discussion: Descendant 2023-01-30 13:51:31 -0500

    Film Discussion: Descendant

    We will kick off our February Black History Month events with a discussion of the Netflix movie Descendant on Feb. 3rd from 8-9pm via Zoom meeting, led by our own Jerry Loftus. The Guardian called Descendant "a striking and sensitive film about how an illegal slave ship led to an Alabama community of inherited trauma but also defiance."  Watch it at your leisure beforehand and come with your thoughts to our Zoom meeting, where we will discuss the film and more. Please RSVP here, and we will email you the Zoom link!

    WHEN
    February 03, 2023 at 8:00pm
    WHERE
    On Zoom
    Brussels 1000
    Belgium
    Google map and directions
    10 rsvps

  • published January 2023 Global Black Caucus Newsletter in News 2023-01-28 05:09:24 -0500

    January 2023 Global Black Caucus Newsletter



    Message from the Chair

    Democrats Abroad Black History Month: Black Resistance in the Past, Present, and Future

    Dear Brothers, Sisters, Allies, and Friends,

    I hope 2023 is off to a good start for you! I know that November ’23 and ‘24 feel far away. But, trust me, they’re not. Plus, there are critical elections even sooner on which we need to focus. That’s why it’s essential that we show a SUPER strong Q1 this year. It will demonstrate that we are not letting our foot off the accelerator (I no longer say “gas” in case someone has an EV 😉) and will allow organizations and candidates to keep the momentum building instead of atrophying and having to rebuild later on. Plus – this enables year-round organizing – which is exactly what we need to do to build trust in marginalized and rural communities who don’t want to be used for their vote. Thus, this email covers Actions and Insights to help keep things rolling now and into the future.

    Insights: 

    • This blog by Dan Pfeiffer about the Kevin McCarthy Clown Car is great at putting the House investigations in perspective. (I know I keep pointing to Dan Pfeiffer’s Message Box for perspectives on key issues, but why reinvent a wheel when someone else is synthesizing it better than I ever could?!)
    • The Debt-Ceiling: This very straightforward article explains what this is all about. And this Politico article shares the White House’s approach to it (it’s non-negotiable that we need to pay our debts) and the House Republicans. Go JOE!!!
    • This phenomenal NYTimes Opinion piece does a great job enumerating the failure points of the GOP right now (especially compared w/past critiques of the Dems) finishing off with a damning line about McCarthy and the GOP: “a hollow speaker for a hollow party”.



    2023 Black History Month theme provided by the Global Black Caucus: Black Resistance in The Past, Present, and Future…

    Black history is a living and breathing story of struggle and overcoming. It is both ancient and in process now. It is the summation and multiplication of Black people’s capacity for innovation and the will to survive and thrive in the face of relentless violence against our humanity.

    Our story is chronicled over thousands of years of Black existence—beginning with the bones of Dinknesh, the great Mousian library, and the civilizations of Mali, Songhai, Kush, and Aksum. It has been likewise expressed in the untold revolts by those who were enslaved, and Black people’s persistent march toward liberation and freedom.

    And, we are making history right now. The largest protest movement in the history of the world was birthed on these shores by our people who have declared that Black lives matter. Black people, and Black women in particular, saving the best prospects for democracy in the last election cycle is yet another testament to this fact.

    Placing Black history in this context of past and present affirms that it does not begin with slavery (as this country is wanton to do all too often). This point of departure is also a reminder that history should not be merely relegated to the past, but that in this very moment, we are making history in a way that will impact the kind of future we will have together.

    With this level-setting as a backdrop, I’d like to draw your attention to a set of questions that I’ve been reflecting on in the advent of this new year. They are questions that invite us to reflect on our history courageously, be informed and intentional about the decisions before us today, and embrace the idea that what we do now will impact our future together.

    Looking back at generations past, what if:

    • African civilizations never encountered European invaders and colonialism?
    • Black people actually received their 40 acres and a mule?
    • Slavery or Jim Crow never happened?
    • Race riots in places like Tulsa, Memphis, Atlanta, and Chicago never happened? FDR made stronger and more explicit provisions for Black folks in the New Deal?
    • The wars on crime and drugs—and the resulting rise of mass incarceration never happened?
    • There was a way to revitalize our neighborhoods without gentrifying them and displacing Black people?
    • The murders of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Medgar Evers, Emmitt Till, Sandra Bland, Breonna Taylor, Felycya Harris, Mia Green, George Floyd, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Trayvon Martin never happened—and they were still alive?

    Asking these questions in this way not only opens our imagination for what might have happened if people living during these times had chosen to do otherwise.  It also invites those of us who are living in the present to consider the critical choices that are before us now—what they will require of us, their impact, and how people 100 years from now will reflect on what we do in this present moment.  Given this, we are left to consider the ‘what if’s’ of our time. 

    What if we:

    • Became a democracy that leads with racial equity and racial justice?
    • Closed racial income and wealth gaps?
    • See poverty (particularly Black poverty) as a systemic and societal failure rather than an indictment on individuals?
    • Embrace a comprehensive reparations program for Black people that redresses America’s history of racism and allows us (and the entire nation) to heal?
    • Convened truth and reconciliation commissions at the national and local levels?
    • Design interlocking systems of education, health, civic participation, and economy that produce racial equity and racial justice?
    • Established a new paradigm for wealth-starting with Black wealth?
    • ALL Black lives really mattered?

    And yes we invite you to have the conversations and share the knowledge you gather here with your family and friends, brothers and sisters, allies, or even the stranger sitting next to you on a bench….

     We've put together lists of  activities/events, books, films, and other information we hope you find interesting, inspiring, helpful, and educational on our GBC website.. The resources on this page are intended to help you learn more about African-American History, and GBC issues and help you develop activities and events for your chapter or precinct. 

    The Black History Month 2023 Resources page will be regularly updated. 

    Where links are provided, they have only suggested sources. Please use the sources you are most comfortable with. 

    If you have any questions or ideas you would like us to include, please feel free to contact us at: [email protected]

    Love and Light,

    Jazz_sig.jpg
    Leedonal 'Jazz' Moore

    • Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus
    • Democrats Abroad Interim Int. Secretary
    • DPCA Voting Rep. DACH


     

    Read more

  • January 27, International Holocaust Day

    January 27, International Holocaust Day

    Home and Belonging

    The theme “Home and Belonging” guides Holocaust remembrance and education in 2023. The theme highlights the humanity of the Holocaust victims and survivors, who had their homes and sense of belonging ripped from them by the perpetrators of the Holocaust. The violence of exclusion began with disinformation and hate speech that lent support to systemic injustice, discrimination, and marginalization and ended with genocidal killing. The theme reminds us of our responsibility to respond with humanity to the victims of atrocity crimes, to counter hate speech, antisemitism, Holocaust distortion and denial, and prejudice – to do all we can to prevent genocide.

    Be The Light In The Darkness....


    #International #HolocaustRemembranceDay #Memory #Home #Belonging #NeverAgain #NeverForget #Educate #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus


  • The National Welfare Rights Organization 1966 - 1975

     

    The National Welfare Rights Organization 1966 - 1975

    An outgrowth of the Civil Rights Movement: Women of Color Rising to lift themselves and their children out of poverty.

    Join the Global Black Caucus for an insightful webinar, during Black History Month 2023, and learn more about the significance of the National Welfare Rights Organization and its activism and legacy which still carries on today.  

    February 11, 2023, at 10:00 AM EST / 16:00 PM CET / 23:00 HKT 

    This webinar is facilitated by Miriam Victory Spiegel, Democrats Abroad Switzerland, born in 1945 in New York City, long-time activist, Community Organizer in New York 1968 – 1980, and Couples and Family Therapist, in Zürich, Switzerland since 1990.

    During this webinar, Miriam will begin her presentation by focussing on the events that she experienced as an activist and community organizer in New York City in 1968. She will describe the theoretical basis of the creation of the National Welfare Rights Organization and its inception within the framework of the Civil Rights Movement. To contextualize, she will share a rearview mirror with us, looking back and trying to understand why so many people of color were left behind in mid-sixties America and seemed doomed to a life of poverty, limited education, poor health, and unemployment. These reflections will take us on a historical journey beginning in 1619 and ending in 1968….

    This event is being co-sponsored by the Global Women's Caucus.

    Join us for an insightful webinar on February 11, 2023, at 10:00 AM EST / 16:00 PM CET / 23:00 HKT 

    As we are already gearing up for the next election cycle, please consider making a donation to help get out the vote in 2024. We can not win the Presidential Election without you!

    Donate today at: https://www.democratsabroad.org/bc-donations



    WHEN
    February 11, 2023 at 10:00am
    WHERE
    Zoom
    Washington, DC
    United States
    Google map and directions
    21 rsvps rsvp

  • published Family Trivia for Martin Luther King Jr. Day in News 2023-01-15 17:37:10 -0500

    Family Trivia for Martin Luther King Jr. Day

    Family Trivia for Martin Luther King Jr. Day

    Gather with your family and friends - test and share your knowledge.


    #Trivia #Quiz #MartinLutherKingJrDay #MLK #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus #CivilRights #IHaveADream


  • Commemorating Martin Luther King Jr. and The Civil Rights Movement

     

    Monday, January 16, 2023, is Martin Luther King Jr. Day and here is why we celebrate this day—plus, information about this influential American, civil rights leader, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate.


    How We Observe MLK Day

    Americans are often encouraged to observe this day not simply as a day off from work, but also as a “Day of Service” to others through appropriate civic, community, and service projects.

    Think of Martin Luther King Jr. Day as an opportunity to give to others in any way you can—whether it’s a community project or simply being kind to others in your community.

    Visit www.MLKDay.gov to find Day of Service projects across the country.

    Sooner or later all the people of the world will have to discover a way to live together in peace …

    –Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)


    Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.

    Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929. He was a Baptist minister and leader of the civil rights movement, championing justice and equality from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968. As he said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Dr. King was also a strong advocate of change through nonviolent civil actions based on his Christian values. He was a great speaker, and his powerful words still resonate with us today.

    Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

    –Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)


    When Is Martin Luther King Jr. Day?

    The third Monday in January is Martin Luther King Jr. Day (often abbreviated to “MLK Day”). It has been a federal holiday since 1986. This means that it is an observed holiday for federal employees, as well as for many schools and businesses. This also means that the holiday does not always fall on Martin Luther King Jr.’s true birth date, January 15.

    This year, Martin Luther King Jr. Day will be observed on Monday, January 16, 2023.

    Year

    Martin Luther King Jr. Day

    2023

    Monday, January 16

    2024

    Monday, January 15

    2025

    Monday, January 20


    Who Was Martin Luther King Jr.?

    Martin Luther King Jr. was born in 1929 in Georgia into a Christian family. His grandfather was a church pastor, his father became a pastor, and then he became a pastor.

    We may have all come on different ships, but we’re in the same boat now.

    –Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)

    After graduating from high school at the age of 15, Martin Luther King went on to receive his B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College. After 3 years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania, he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class and awarded the B.D. in 1951. After winning a fellowship at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston, he met and married Coretta Scott, and they started a family.

    See more facts about the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr.

    In 1954, Martin Luther King Jr. had become pastor of a church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights, King believed in nonviolence, following Gandhi’s philosophy.

    Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men.

    –Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)


    The Fight Against Segregation

    In 1955, he began his struggle to persuade the U.S. government to declare the policy of racial discrimination unlawful. He led the first large nonviolent demonstration against segregated buses. However, racists responded with violence to his nonviolent initiative.

    Peace is not merely a distant goal that we seek, but a means by which we arrive at that goal.”

    –Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)

    In Birmingham, Alabama, in the spring of 1963, King’s campaign to end segregation at lunch counters and in hiring practices drew nationwide attention when the police turned dogs and fire hoses on the demonstrators. King was jailed along with large numbers of his supporters, including hundreds of schoolchildren. His supporters did not, however, include all the black clergy of Birmingham, and he was strongly opposed by some of the white clergy who had issued a statement urging African Americans not to support the demonstrations. From the Birmingham jail, King wrote a letter of great eloquence in which he spelled out his philosophy of nonviolence:

    You may well ask: “Why direct action? Why sit-ins, marches, and so forth? Isn’t negotiation a better path?” You are quite right in calling for negotiation. Indeed, this is the very purpose of direct action. Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue.

    In December 1956, the Supreme Court declared bus segregation unconstitutional.

    In 1957, King was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He led according to his beliefs from Christianity, with nonviolent influences from Gandhi. He traveled greatly, wrote five books and numerous articles, and led many initiatives to campaign for the proper voter registration of people of color.

    Photo: A statue of Dr. King stands at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C.


    “I Have a Dream”

    On August 28, 1963, King directed a march of 250,000 demonstrators to Washington, D.C., where he gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

    Martin Luther King Jr. dreamed that the inhabitants of the United States would be judged by their personal qualities and not by the color of their skin:

    “I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed, ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.’”

    The following year, President Johnson signed a law prohibiting all racial discrimination. 

    Photo: President Johnson signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964, in Washington D.C. as Martin Luther King, Jr., and others look on. 

    In 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. was awarded Nobel Peace Prize at the young age of 35 for his peaceful campaign against racism. He turned over the prize money of $54,123 to support the civil rights movement. Here is his acceptance speech.

    Peace is more precious than diamonds or silver or gold.”

    –Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)

    On April 4, 1968, King was assassinated by a racist while speaking in Tennessee in support of the struggling garbage workers of that city. It had been only 4 years earlier that he had received the Nobel Peace Prize for his nonviolent campaign against racism.


    #MartinLutherKingJrDay #MLK #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus #CivilRights #IHaveADream








  • published First Seat Flipped in 2023! in News 2023-01-13 17:05:40 -0500

    First Seat Flipped in 2023!

    Congratulations

    Aaron Rouse wins the Virginia Special Election! Seat flipped! 


    #Senator #AaronRouse #VADems #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus  #VirginaBeachSpecialElection #VoteFromAbroad #SeatFlipped #BlackVotesMatter #BlackRepresentationMatters  


  • published Happy New Year! in News 2022-12-31 14:45:37 -0500

    Happy New Year!

    Dear Brothers, Sisters, Allies, and Friends,
     
    May 2023 be filled with good health, joy, laughter, and above all love, compassion, empathy, and shared knowledge.
     
    2023 gives us a great opportunity to ready up for the 2024 Presidential Elections, which we can only win by uniting and including all willing and eligible American Voters Living Abroad in all corners of the world.
     
    United We Are. United We Stand. United We Win!
     
    Huge Thank You to the entire Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus Team, Democrats Abroad, and ALL our Volunteers and generous Donors for everything you have done in 2022.
     
    In 2023, let’s continue to stand up for our rights and continue to save and uphold our democracy.
     
    Together, We Can!
     
    Love and Light,
    Your GBC

     



  • published December 2022 Global Black Caucus Newsletter in News 2022-12-29 07:44:11 -0500

    December 2022 Global Black Caucus Newsletter



    Message from the Chair

    Democrats Abroad Black Caucus Happy Holidays!

    Dear Brothers, Sisters, Allies, and Friends,

    The Global Black Caucus is wishing you Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year. May good health, peace, and the joy of the holidays be with you, today and throughout the new year.

    I want to use the momentum of our highest gratitude to all our Volunteers and Supporters, our domestic and international Collaborators, and all Democrats Abroad Volunteers who all share the same mission and passion of Getting Out The Vote and fighting for upholding our Fundamental Rights To Vote!

    Please read our final statement of 2022 on the Respect For Marriage Act.

    Whilst 2022 is nearly at an end, our GBC mission continues to advocate on issues on behalf of our African-American Brothers, Sisters, and Allies.

    Please know that you are not alone. Our GBC Community is made up of strong, diverse, and supportive members from all around the world who are always there for each other and hear one out, and if you do feel alone and would like to exchange some thoughts, you may always drop us an email: [email protected]

    Love and Light,

    Jazz_sig.jpg
    Leedonal 'Jazz' Moore

    • Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus
    • Democrats Abroad Interim Int. Secretary
    • DPCA Voting Rep. DACH


     

    Read more

  • published Happy Kwanzaa! Habari Gani? in News 2022-12-27 08:50:44 -0500

    Happy Kwanzaa! Habari Gani?

    Happy Kwanzaa!

    Habari Gani?

    Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration honoring African heritage in African American culture and takes place from December 26th to January 1st.  All Seven Principles of #Kwanzaa are inspiring, uplifting, positive, and centered on traditions of the African harvest season. In fact, the name Kwanzaa comes from the #Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning “first fruits of the harvest.“

    Can you list all 7 principles of Kwanzaa?

    The “Nguzo Saba” or as it translates from Swahili to English as “The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa” is a value system and set of principles which outlines the mission statement and intentions of Kwanzaa.

    Kwanzaa founder Dr. Maulana Karenga describes the principles as “…the core and consciousness of Kwanzaa. They are posed as the matrix and minimum set of values African Americans need to rescue and reconstruct their life in their own image and interest and build and sustain an Afrocentric family, community and culture.”

    The Nguzo Saba are listed as:

    🔴🕯Umoja (Unity)
    ⚫️🕯Kujichangulia (Self-Determination)
    🔴🕯Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)
    ⚫️🕯Ujaama (cooperative economics)
    🔴🕯Nia (purpose)
    ⚫️🕯Kuumba (creativity)
    🔴🕯Imani (faith)

    During Kwanzaa someone will informally ask, “Habari Gani?” or “What's happening?” in Swahili throughout the day. Somone will respond with the principle for the day, which today is “Umoja” which translates into English as “Unity”. To learn more about Kwanzaa’s history, cultural expressions, and to find fun activities for new families & children, as well as more information on the 7 principles, join our virtual Kwanzaa celebration: nmaahc.si.edu/kwanzaa


    #Unity #Umoja#DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus #HabariGani #Mazao #Mkeka #Muhindi #Kinara #MishumaaSaba#KikombeChaUmoja #Zawadi #HappyKwanzaa


  • published Happy Holidays in News 2022-12-24 08:03:12 -0500

    Happy Holidays

    The Global Black Caucus is wishing you Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year.

    May good health, peace, and the joy of the holidays be with you, today and throughout the new year. 🙏🏾💙

    We also would like to use the momentum of our highest gratitude to all our Volunteers and Supporters, our domestic and international Collaborators, and all Democrats Abroad Volunteers whom all share the same mission and passion of Getting Out The Vote and fighting for upholding our Fundamental Human Rights! 🙏🏾💙

    Please read our final statement of 2022 on the Respect For Marriage Act here: Statement

    Whilst 2022 is nearly at an end, our GBC mission continues to advocate on issues on behalf of our African-American Brothers, Sisters, and Allies.

    Please know that you are not alone. Our GBC Community is made up of strong, diverse, and supportive members from all around the world who are always there for each other and hear one out, and if you do feel alone and would like to exchange some thoughts, you may always drop us an email: [email protected]

    Love and Light,


    Leedonal 'Jazz' Moore 

    Chair Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus


    #HappyHolidays #ThankYou #Voters #Volunteers #DemsAbroad #Democrats #GlobalBlackCaucus #HappyNewYear #LoveAndLight


  • published Good Trouble! in News 2022-12-14 18:03:45 -0500

    Good Trouble!

    Congressman John Lewis will be honored on a new postage stamp next year! Let it always remind us to get in the #GoodTrouble that Congressman Lewis taught us.

    In a Tuesday announcement, the U.S. Postal Service said the stamp "celebrates the life and legacy" of the leader from Georgia, who risked his life protesting against segregation and other injustices in the violent Jim Crow-era South.

    "Lewis spent more than 30 years in Congress steadfastly defending and building on key civil rights gains that he had helped achieve in the 1960s. Even in the face of hatred and violence, as well as some 45 arrests, Lewis remained resolute in his commitment to what he liked to call 'good trouble,'" USPS said in a news release.


     #RepresentationMatters #JohnLewis #USPS #Stamp


Laureate Tolerantia Award, DragQueen, LGBTIQ Advocate, Presenter, FB: Jazzmin Dian Moore YouTube: jazzmindianmoore snapchat:jazzilee1 Insta: Jazzmindianmoore