Violence Against Women Task Force, Global Comms, Research, DAF-Marseille Secretary

  • Leading with Purpose: Tackling Structural Barriers to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

     
    The Global Women's Caucus and the Global Black Caucus are honored to have Dr. Rosabeth Moss Kanter, the Ernest  L. Arbukle Professor, Harvard Business School, speak on the continuing challenges of gender equality and diversity in leadership. Dr. Kanter first identified significant barriers to the advancement of women in the corporate world in the classic, award-winning book, Men and Women of the Corporation. Later research identified how being a minority in a group, or a "token", can affect one's performance due to enhanced visibility and performance pressure, illustrated brilliantly in the landmark video, "A Tale of 'O': On Being Different".  

    Professor Kanter will unravel questions such as:  Where has there been progress? What challenges and pitfalls remain? What issues are universal, and which vary by ethnicity, race, and social class? How can we “think outside the building” (beyond current structures and constraints) to mobilize activists for a more just and equitable world? Join us on Tuesday, September 21st at 11 am EDT to gain insights from this formidable leader on working towards a more just and equitable world. 

     
    RSVP below! You will receive your link with a reminder mail shortly before the event.


    ROSABETH MOSS KANTER 

    Rosabeth Moss Kanter holds the Ernest L. Arbuckle Professorship at Harvard Business School, specializing in  strategy, innovation, and leadership for change. Her strategic and practical insights guide leaders worldwide  through teaching, writing, and direct consultation to major corporations, governments, and start-up ventures. She  co-founded the Harvard University-wide Advanced Leadership Initiative, guiding its planning from 2005 to its  launch in 2008 and serving as Founding Chair and Director from 2008-2018 as it became a growing international  model for a new stage of higher education preparing successful top leaders to apply their skills to national and  global challenges. Author or co-author of 20 books, her latest book, Think Outside the Building: How Advanced  Leaders Can Change the World One Smart Innovation at a Time, has won a number of accolades

    The former chief Editor of Harvard Business Review, Professor Kanter has been repeatedly named to lists such as the “50 most powerful women in the world” (Times of London), and the “50 most influential business thinkers in  the world” (Thinkers 50, and in November 2019 received their biannual Lifetime Achievement Award). She has  received 24 honorary doctoral degrees, as well as numerous leadership awards, lifetime achievement awards, and  

    prizes. These include Distinguished Career Awards from the Academy of Management and the American  Sociological Association (Organizations, Occupations and Work Section); the World Teleport Association's  “Intelligent Community Visionary of the Year” award; the Pinnacle Award for Lifetime Achievement from the  Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce; the International Leadership Award from the Association of Leadership  Professionals; the Warren Bennis Award for Leadership Excellence; the Everett Rogers Innovation Award from  the Norman Lear Center for media and society; and several Harvard Business Review McKinsey Awards for the  years’ best articles. Other awards honor her thought leadership and community impact. 

    Before Think Outside the Building, her previous book, MOVE: Putting America's Infrastructure Back in the Lead,  a New York Times Editors’ Choice, is a sweeping look across industries and technologies shaping the future of  mobility and the leadership required for transformation. Her book The Change Masters was named one of the  most influential business books of the 20th century (Financial Times); SuperCorp: How Vanguard Companies  Create Innovation, Profits, Growth, and Social Good, one of the ten best business books of the year by  Amazon.com; Evolve! Succeeding in the Digital Culture of Tomorrow, one of the five best books of the year by  the Toronto Star. Her book Confidence: How Winning & Losing Streaks Begin & End, a New York Times bestseller (also a #1 Business Week bestseller), describes the culture of high-performance organizations compared  with those in decline and shows how to lead turnarounds, whether in businesses, schools, sports teams, or  countries. Men & Women of the Corporation, winner of the C. Wright Mills award for the best book on social  issues and often called a classic, offers insight into the individual and organizational factors that promote success  or perpetuate disadvantage for women; a related video, A Tale of ‘O’: On Being Different, is a widely-used tool  for diversity training. A related book, Work & Family in the United States, set a policy agenda, honored by a  coalition of university centers creating in her honor the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for the best work/family  research. Another award-winning book, When Giants Learn to Dance, shows how to master the new terms of  competition at the dawn of the global information age. World Class: Thriving Locally in the Global Economy identifies the dilemmas of globalization for cities, a theme continuing in her book MOVE

    She advises numerous CEOs and senior executives through her consulting group and also serving as a Senior  Advisor for IBM’s Global Citizenship portfolio from 1999-2012. She has served on many business and non-profit  boards, such as City Year, the urban “Peace Corps” addressing the school dropout crisis through national service,  and on commissions including the Governor’s Council of Economic Advisors, the U.S. Malcolm Baldrige  National Quality Award, and others. She speaks widely, and has shared the platform with Presidents, Prime  Ministers, and CEOs at major events, such as the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, and national  industry conferences in over 20 countries. Before joining the Harvard Business School faculty, she held tenured  professorships at Yale University and Brandeis University and was a Fellow at Harvard Law School,  simultaneously holding a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her Ph.D. is from the University of Michigan. --December 2020


    Location Local Event Start Time
    Vancouver, Canada 8:00 AM
    Minneapolis, USA 10:00 AM
    Washington DC, USA 11:00 AM
    London, UK 4:00 PM
    Frankfurt, Germany 5:00 PM
    Nairobi, Kenya 7:00 PM
    Dubai, UAE 8:00 PM
    Bangkok, Thailand 11:00 PM
    Beijing, China 12:00 AM + 1 day
    WHEN
    September 21, 2021 at 11:00am
    WHERE
    Webinar
    89 rsvps rsvp

  • VAW Project: Call for Volunteers!

    The Violence Against Women Project is urgently seeking volunteers to gather information that will help American women overseas who are victims of violent situations.
    We’re looking for a minimum 6 month commitment, a passion for this cause, and people who are team players.
    Either email us at [email protected], or join one of the upcoming Zoom calls . We look forward to meeting you!

  • published VAW Volunteer Meeting/Briefing in Events 2021-08-17 05:27:59 -0400

    VAW Volunteer Briefing/Meeting

    Violence Against Women Team
    Volunteer Briefing Meetings

     

    Join us on September 20, 2021, at 12 PM ET / 6 PM Paris for the VAW Volunteer Briefing Meeting.
    (Monthly briefings/meetings through December 20, 2021)

    Call for Volunteers !

    The Violence Against Women Project is seeking volunteers to gather information that will help American women overseas who are victims of violent situations.

    We’re looking for a minimum 6 month commitment, a passion for this cause, and people who are team players.

    Either email us at [email protected], or join one of the upcoming Zoom calls. We look forward to meeting you!

    WHEN
    September 20, 2021 at 12:00pm
    WHERE
    RSVP for Zoom link
    14 rsvps rsvp

  • Call to Action: The Military Justice Improvement and Increased Prevention Act

    Immediate attention needed from across the globe - You CAN make a difference.

    OUR GOAL IS TO HAVE EMAILS SENT BY NEXT WEEK SO PLEASE PASS THIS MESSAGE ON TO YOUR MEMBERSHIP ASAP!!

    We have shared our support of Senator Kirsten Gillibrand’s MJIA legislation -now called The Military Justice Improvement and Increased Prevention Act (MJI-IPA) with you over the past several months. At this very moment, we have the opportunity to help push it over the finish line!

    This legislation has been introduced consistently since 2013 and has, just as consistently, been blocked in the Senate. We believe that there must not be any further delay in implementing the changes reflected in the Military Justice and Increased Prevention Act. This past week we saw major shifts in support and greatly increased possibility for passage. Senator Gillibrand has worked hard to refine and strengthen the legislation, now called The Military Justice Improvement and Increased Prevention Act. As a result, it has gleaned additional co-sponsors from both sides of the aisle (see the New York Times article below for more information on this powerful coalition which has continued to grow.

    The object of Senator Gillibrand’s plan is to create a fair and impartial military justice system, for all felonies (rape, murder, child abuse, etc), to create a professional system, less subject to unqualified or improperly motivated decision-making.

    In essence, it removes the power to make investigative and prosecutorial decisions from the purview of 3% of Commanders within the accused’s chain of command and puts them into the hands of professional, trained senior military prosecutors.

    For more comprehensive background information on the MJI-IPA go to: https://www.gillibrand.senate.gov/mjia

    Ways to help ensure the necessary changes are made:

    1. CONTACT YOUR LEGISLATORS TO THANK THEM OR TO ASK FOR THEIR SUPPORT

    Use the link below to find the latest position of your Senators (and a direct link to send messages via their email and twitter).You can be sure that every communication is being counted and will count.

    It is critical that our messaging be positive - Use a light touch. Aggressive advocacy will backfire. Our targets currently are Whitehouse, Sinema, Rosen and Carper. BUT again, a light touch is imperative.

    FYI - On the chart it appears we have the 60 votes needed. But that is just a list and certainly no guarantee. A lot can happen between now and the conclusion of the process which will occur over the coming month(s). This is the time to both solidify support and increase the numbers.

    https://www.protectourdefenders.com/senate/

    The link below is a fact sheet if you’d like to incorporate more specifics in your message. But don’t worry! That you’ve taken the trouble to contact them is what matters most.

    https://www.protectourdefenders.com/factsheet/

    2. SEND A LETTER TO YOUR LEGISLATOR

    Here is a link to obtain addresses:

    https://www.senate.gov/senators/senators-contact.htm

    Sample letter for survivors:

    Dear Senator ______, I’m a US Air Force veteran. Like so many service members, I left the military after I was sexually assaulted. All I ever wanted to do was serve my country. Thousands of servicemembers and civilians are sexually assaulted each year. Sadly, the number of reported sexual assaults keeps rising, and the number of convictions is falling.

    To fix our military justice system we need to put the prosecution of serious crimes like rape and murder into the hands of trained military law professionals. I urge you to support veterans like me by voting for the Military Justice Improvement & Increased Prevention Act. Thank you.

    Sample letter for general public:

    Dear Senator ______, I’m writing to you about the issue of sexual assault in our military. Today, the Department of Defense reports increasing sexual assaults by servicemembers, but decreasing conviction rates. Despite years of Congressional inquiries, thousands are raped or sexually assaulted every year. In many of those cases, the assailant is someone in the survivor’s own chain of command. Only a small fraction of the perpetrators are ever held accountable for their heinous, violent crimes.

    The bipartisan Military Justice Improvement & Increased Prevention Act is designed to professionalize how the military prosecutes serious crimes like sexual assault, and to remove the fear that survivors of military sexual assault experience when deciding whether to even report these crimes. A Pentagon survey found that 64% of survivors say they have experienced some form of retaliation for reporting the crime. Please vote for the Military Justice Improvement & Increased Prevention Act

    3. USE YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA to ENCOURAGE YOUR FRIENDS AND FAMILY TO CONTACT THEIR LEGISLATORS

    Tag your Senators if you can because their staff monitors social media mentions.

    Sample Tweet: Senator @MittRomney, will you stand with military sexual assault survivors to pass the Military Justice Improvement & Increased Prevention Act? Veterans like me need your help! #MeToo #MeTooMilitary #IAmVanessaGuillen #MJIIPA

    Below are links to articles and videos you can use as posts:

    https://www.protectourdefenders.com/new-york-times-gillibrand-makes-major-push-to-reform-military-justice-system/

    https://www.protectourdefenders.com/remarks-from-protect-our-defenders-president-don-christensen-at-the-senate-armed-services-committee-hearing-on-sexual-assault-in-the-armed-forces/

    https://www.facebook.com/DemsAbroad/videos/28886917629236

    4. SEND A LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    Amplify your voice and reach the public and your legislators.

    This doesn’t need to be a massive missive.

    Sample letter for survivors:

    Dear Senator ______, I’m a US Air Force veteran. Like so many service members, I left the military after I was sexually assaulted. All I ever wanted to do was serve my country. Thousands of servicemembers and civilians are sexually assaulted each year. Sadly, the number of reported sexual assaults keeps rising, and the number of convictions falling.

    To fix our military justice system we need to put the prosecution of serious crimes like rape and murder into the hands of trained military law professionals. I urge you to support veterans like me by voting for the Military Justice Improvement & Increased Prevention Act. Thank you.

    Sample letter for general public:

    Dear Senator ______, I’m writing to you about the issue of sexual assault in our military. Today, the Department of Defense reports increasing sexual assaults by servicemembers, but decreasing conviction rates. Despite years of Congressional inquiries, thousands are raped or sexually assaulted every year. In many of those cases, the assailant is someone in the survivor’s own chain of command. Only a small fraction of the perpetrators are ever held accountable for their heinous, violent crimes.

    The bipartisan Military Justice Improvement & Increased Prevention Act is designed to professionalize how the military prosecutes serious crimes like sexual assault, and to remove the fear that survivors of military sexual assault experience when deciding whether to even report these crimes. A Pentagon survey found that 64% of survivors say they have experienced some form of retaliation for reporting the crime. Please vote for the Military Justice Improvement & Increased Prevention Act.

    Here is another sample:

    :https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#search/denise.dpca%40gmail.com/KtbxLxgNKCnmdTjlrpNdJGnGvgcTFmkcPL?projector=1&messagePartId=0.1

    IF YOU HAVE BEEN A VICTIM OF SEXUAL ASSAULT WITHIN A MILITARY CONTEXT, YOU MAY CHOOSE TO SHARE YOUR STORY WITH LEGISLATORS VIA A SHORT VIDEO

    The testimony of victims has been very powerful and has built support among the growing group of “pro” legislators. Protect Our Defenders (with whom we have been working) has set up a process:

    https://www.protectourdefenders.com/upload/


  • signed up on AAPI Signup 2021-04-05 12:37:11 -0400

  • signed up on LGBTQ+ Signup 2021-04-05 12:36:48 -0400

  • signed up on Hispanic Caucus Signup 2021-04-05 12:36:12 -0400

  • Sexual Assault Awareness Month

    Sexual Assault Awareness Month (SAAM)

    The Global Women’s Caucus Violence Against Women Action Team hopes you will join us in observing Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

    The impact of sexual assault and other forms of sexual violence is felt universally throughout the world. No segment of society is unaffected, although some disproportionately suffer more directly than others. There is no country free of this raging epidemic, and the United States is certainly not a leading light in the prevention or prosecution of sexual crimes. 

    Read more

  • @kidartistry tweeted link to ERA Stories. 2021-03-14 16:04:09 -0400

    Why ERA is Important to Me

    2021 could be the year that women’s rights are secured in the U.S. Constitution – just 245 years after white men. The Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) is positioned to be the 28th amendment once either the Senate removes the deadline from the 1972 resolution OR the Department of Justice instructs the US Archivist to add it. The threshold of 38 states ratifying it happened in 2020 but it has been held up due to some technicalities. YOU can help promote awareness and action on the ERA. 

    Would you like to tell Congress why the ERA is important to you? Here's how: Take a selfie, then add your picture and story in the textbox. You can also make a video and send in the url (just add the link in the textbox).   Your story can be up to 500 words.   If you need more words, just continue with additional posts.

     

    Please include your Country of Residence, and Voting State at the end of your story.  Including your Name is optional.

    We'll share these stories with Congressional allies to help them in their fight to finally add the ERA to the US Constitution. 
    Please note that the stories below are all user submitted and reflect individual opinions. By sharing your story here you are consenting to sharing your story publicly both on this site and with Congress. 

    Click here to read the first set of over 100 stories sent on March 25 to the Senate.


  • Too many generations of women in my family have died without seeing the ERA passed.

    Having been a political activist beginning in the 60's I have gotten used to "hurry up and wait" experiences and have heard many specious arguments . However, the absolutely baseless arguments against the ERA and the painfully long battle they have engendered is , as the expression goes, getting on "my last nerve". I quit my job to work on the ERA campaign full time after the deadline was extended to June 30, 1982. I worked in Washington and travelled to the three targetted, unratified states and lobbied, helped organize events and supported NOW's leader Eleanor Smeal in her efforts to coordinate the fight against, ignorance and disinformation,, the insurance industry and other business interests and against misogynistic and/or successfully lobbied legislators. I saw and heard things which ruined forever my blind admiration for "public servants" which several members of my family had created by actually delivering service to the public in their elected positions. The legislatures in Oklahoma, Florida and Illiinois didn't ratify and on June 30 I joined with many other men and women across the street from the White House, in shock and mourning. My grandparents, parents, sisters, all of my family struggled to understand why something so fair, reasonable and highly popular was so difficult to achieve. I still struggle 39 years later. Once again the ERA not only makes sense but is absolutely necessary to protect women against the regressive actions of an unprincipled group of leaders in the Republican Senate who have forced their members into similarly unprincipled obstructionism. The right decision would be to do whatever is necessary to get this done. The archivist should be signing, Congress should be overturning an unnecessary and unusual deadline and finally women should be written into the Constitution. The vast majority of people want this to happen. Most of the rest aren't paying attention or are misinformed or are involved with a business which profits from discriminating against women. If this doesn't happen, I can only say with confidence that the rising tide of women with political, social and economic power will use it to replace those who have fought against women's rights and opportunities. When I think of my grandmothers and my mother, I am very aware of how their opportunities were limited. When I think of myself and my sisters, I think of the many battles we had to fight , law by law, to even approach a playing field, never mind a level one. My nieces and my nephews daughters will not accept what we put up with. They won't fight over and over again for the same crumbs. They will demand and, I assure you they will get what we have always deserved and nothing less. Check the numbers, boys, and do the math. What you've been doing isn't smart, isn't popular, and isn't in the public good. So, let's try something different, shall we? Marnie Delaney/ Living in France/Vote in California


  • RED ACTION

    Reauthorization Of The Violence Against Women Act  

    The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) is a U.S. federal law, signed by President Bill Clinton on September 13, 1994.  It was authored by then-Senator Joe Biden (DE), and co-authored by Representative Louise Slaughter (NY). It was passed in Congress (234/195 House, 61/38 Senate).

    The law established a budget (initially $1.6 billion) to: 

    • Investigate violence against women crimes 
    • Prosecute perpetrators of such crimes
    • Impose requirements for restitution to victims by perpetrators
    • Provide reparations, if prosecutors opt not to prosecute a crime

    Extensions of the Law were passed in 2000, 2005 and 2013. In each case, there were changes which met with varying degrees of opposition, generally from Republicans and organizations such as the NRA and other conservative groups.  In 2019 reauthorization was defeated in the Republican Senate.

    Reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act is on President Biden’s 100-day agenda, and set to be taken up by the House the week of March 18th.

    CURRENT SITUATION

    • The House will take up and vote the week of March 18. Passage is expected but not guaranteed, therefore contacting Representatives is urgent.
    • We’ll be watching the Biden Budget to demonstrate his priority on this legislation
    • Senate battle will be difficult with opposition based on 1) the “boyfriend loophole”  2) indigenous people and immigrant components and 3) partisanship
    • The challenge is to demonstrate a strong commitment to this legislation, and make sure to only support legislators who recognize its importance, including all of the “controversial” elements.

    CALL to ACTION

    Contact your representatives in Congress to urge their support for reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act. Here are sample messages, however, we encourage you to add any message about your personal connection to this issue with which you feel comfortable.  This will increase the impact of your message.

    Short version (appropriate for quick messages or for supportive legislators): 

    “Violence against women and girls is a human rights violation, and a deterrent to an equitable and peaceful world. It is devastating and its impact is enormous and widespread. I support the Violence Against Women Act and call on you to support it as well.”

    Extended version:

    “The crisis of gender-based violence continues to grow, far outpacing available resources (many of which have been disappearing for lack of funds). The need for funds to prevent, prosecute and provide resources to victims is overwhelming and Congress has not done enough to provide these resources to all Americans.  This unending culture of violence has serious impacts on the majority of the population, either directly or indirectly, and inaction is not acceptable.  I support the Violence Against Women Act and will demonstrate that support with my vote. I call on you to support it too.”

    Ways to contact representatives:

    • Email
    • Phone call
    • Postcard

    Find your Representative here and your Senators here

    Encourage your family and friends, both in the US and abroad, to do the same.  Also, encourage anyone who can possibly visit the local or DC office of their legislator to do so in a more dramatic show of support and importance.


  • published Eliminating Violence Against Women in News 2021-01-17 06:00:04 -0500

    Eliminating Violence Against Women

    Twenty-seven years ago, President Bill Clinton signed into law the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (VAWA), a landmark piece of legislation, authored by then-Senator Joe Biden. It was designed to support and protect survivors of domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault. Since that time, the federal government has awarded more than $8 billion in grants to local, state, and tribal governments and organizations, enabling them to develop programs and services to best implement the law's purpose. 

    Read more

  • signed up on Progressive Caucus Signup 2020-08-05 18:13:06 -0400

  • signed up on Global Black Caucus Signup 2020-07-27 03:09:49 -0400

  • signed up on Women's Caucus 2021-03-14 16:11:30 -0400

     

    Sign up