DC Statehood Panel

DC Statehood Event Banner

Denying statehood to Washington D.C. is a racial, economic and democratic injustice. Did you know that the nearly 700,000 people living in Washington, D.C. don’t have any voting representation in Congress? The Democratic Party and Democrats Abroad are fighting to change that, and we need your help! 

Join us for an insightful discussion on Saturday, February 26 at 5:30pm Eastern about the history of the (under)representation of Washington, D.C. and pathways to finally establishing the District as the 51st state. 

We will hear from leading actors in the movement for D.C. statehood including:

  • Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton
  • U.S. Representative - DC Dr. Oye Owolewa

To submit questions in advance, please email: [email protected] 

This event is sponsored by Democrats Abroad’s Global Black Caucus (GBC) and the DA Africa Committee,  which are entirely volunteer-run and donation-funded.

Please support the GBC and Democrats Abroad with a donation that will help us get out the vote among Black and D.C. voters around the world in 2022: https://www.democratsabroad.org/bc-donations.


Hon. Prof. Eleanor Holmes-Norton

Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, now in her fifteenth term as the Congresswoman for the District of Columbia, is the Chair of the House Subcommittee on Highways and Transit. She serves on two committees: the Committee on Oversight and Reform and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.

Before her congressional service, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to serve as the first woman to chair the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. She came to Congress as a national figure who had been a civil rights and feminist leader, tenured professor of law, and board member at three Fortune 500 companies. Congresswoman Norton has been named one of the 100 most important American women in one survey and one of the most powerful women in Washington in another. The Congresswoman's work for full congressional voting representation and for full democracy for the people of the District of Columbia continues her lifelong struggle for universal human and civil rights.

Congresswoman Norton's accomplishments in breaking barriers for her disempowered district are matched by her success in bringing home unique economic benefits to her constituents. Among them are senatorial courtesy to recommend federal judges, the U.S. Attorney, and other significant federal law enforcement positions for the District; up to $10,000 per year for all D.C. high school graduates to attend any public U.S. college or university and up to $2,500 per year to many private colleges and universities; a unique $5,000 D.C. homebuyer tax credit, which has sharply increased home ownership in the District and was a major factor in stabilizing the city's population; and D.C. business tax incentives, including a significant wage credit for employing D.C. residents, which has maintained businesses and residents in the District.

Congresswoman Norton also has brought significant economic development to the District of Columbia throughout her service in Congress, creating and preserving jobs in D.C. The most significant are her work in bringing to D.C. the U.S. Department of Homeland Security headquarters compound, now under construction, and is the largest federal construction project in the country; her bill that is developing the 55 acre-Southeast Federal Center, the first private development on federal land; her work that resulted in the relocation of 6,000 jobs to the Washington Navy Yard; and her successful efforts to bring to the District the new headquarters for the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, along with an additional Metro station at New York Avenue, which has resulted in the development of the NOMA neighborhood.

Congresswoman Norton helped end the city's most serious financial crisis in a century, in the 1990's,by achieving a historic package that for the first time restructured the financial relationship between Congress and the District, by transferring $5 billion in unfunded pension liabilities and billions more in state costs to the federal government.

The Congresswoman, who taught law full time before being elected, is a tenured professor of law at Georgetown University, teaching an upper-class seminar there every year. After receiving her bachelor's degree from Antioch College in Ohio, she simultaneously earned her law degree and a master's degree in American Studies from Yale University. Yale Law School has awarded her the Citation of Merit for outstanding alumni, and Yale Graduate School of Arts and Sciences has awarded her the Wilbur Cross Medal for outstanding alumni, the highest awards conferred by each on alumni. She is the recipient of more than 50 honorary degrees.

Dr. Oye Owolewa

Dr. Oye Owolewa is a licensed pharmacist, nature explorer and current U.S. Representative of Washington, DC. His passion to guide his community to healthy outcomes led him to the pharmacy profession, and he has practiced since 2014. Since moving to DC, Dr. Oye spent his non-working time exposing DC elementary students to science through hands-on learning and advocated for strategies to reduce prescription drug abuse. His work led him to earn the Cardinal Health Generation Rx Champions Award by the Washington DC Pharmacy Association.

Dr. Oye began engaging in neighborhood politics and successfully ran for and was elected Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner for his community. Dr. Oye notably increased science enrichment in Southeast DC, improved traffic safety infrastructure, and formed a collaboration with Howard students participating in Councilman Trayon White’s health fairs.
As Commissioner, Dr. Oye planted his flag in the fight for DC statehood. The fight for statehood led him to a successful run for U.S. Representative. Upon his Nov. 2020 Election victory, Dr. Oye became the first Nigerian-American elected to federal office.

Now as U.S. Representative, his primary focuses include improving health care, DC statehood, immigration reform and income equality. As Representative, Dr. Oye collaborates with non-profit organizations to bring resources to the most marginalized communities in the District and uses his platform to increase the involvement of young people.

WHEN
February 26, 2022 at 5:30pm - 7pm Eastern Time (US & Canada)
WHERE
Zoom-ONLINE
49 RSVPS
Joan Solon Kathryn Solon Uduak Ikpe Sue Alksnis Sharon Ann Ligons Yvonne Davies Charity Moschopoulos Diane Longo Colleen Daley Robert Kelley Bradley Jackson Michael Ramos Kate Cooper Virginia Diack Adrienne Johnson James Mercereau Teresa Ritterhoff James Lockett Theresa Morelli Kenton Barnes Cindy Bjoelgerud Brigitte Cirilli Joseph Swingle Tara Cooper Mark Doore Joann Sochor David Sigrist Teresa Howie Barbara Gerratana Meredith Wheeler Gregory Ford maryann schmunk Whitney Isenhower Hall Dave Warren Knox Kaitlyn Kennedy Adrianne George Leedonal Moore

Who's RSVPing

Will you come?