A Message to Delaware Voters

Your vote this fall is important to Delaware! We have a chance to win key elections this year but we need your help. We have several races where you can make a difference, including making sure we elect a Democratic Attorney General committed to criminal justice reform and a Democratic State Treasurer who will prioritize Main Street over Wall Street. We also must maintain and grow our narrow one-seat majority in the State Senate. And we must keep our Congressional delegation blue, as the Republican nominees for the U.S. House and Senate are dangerous extremists loyal to President Trump. For more information about these elections, please visit www.deldems.org.

Even if you voted from abroad in the past, if you haven't yet requested your ballot this year, you still need to do so to make sure you can vote. Just go to votefromabroad.org, fill in the Federal request form, print, sign and send it in to your local election office here in Delaware.

On behalf of the Delaware Democratic Party I thank you for your commitment to voting!

Democratically yours,
Erik Raser-Schramm
Chairman, Delaware Democratic Party

 

Your deadlines are coming up. Don't forget:

REGISTER to vote from abroad by Monday, October 22. Your registration form will also request your ballot and may be sent by email, fax or postal mail. We recommend sending your request form by email or fax, and having your ballot delivered to you by email.

-or-

REQUEST your overseas absentee ballot by email/online or fax by Monday, November 5, 12 noon EST. Request to receive your ballot by postal mail by Friday, November 2. You may send your request form by email, fax, postal mail, or online using Vote Delaware system at ivote.de.gov. We recommend sending your request form by email, fax or online, and having your ballot delivered to you by email. Due to delivery time we don't recommend having your ballot delivered to you by post.

 

RETURN your ballot to your local election office by email or fax by Tuesday, November 6, 8 pm EST.

 

All overseas voters may vote in elections for federal offices (US House and US Senate races). Overseas voters who indicate they “intend to return” may also vote in Delaware state elections.

Note: When you fill in your ballot request form, be aware that selecting “I intend to return” rather than “my return is uncertain” may contribute towards establishing yourself as a tax resident in your voting state. Because the legal requirements to establish "residence" or "domicile" for tax purposes are determined by state law and the specific facts of your life, before you note that you intend to return on your form you may consider seeking advice on these matters from your tax professional.


A Message to Colorado Voters

Your vote this fall is important to Colorado! Our state is turning blue but we need your help. We have several races where you can make a difference, including Jared Polis for Governor, Phil Weiser for Attorney General, and Jena Griswold for Secretary of State. We need your help to pick up just one more Senate Seat to take the majority and to win Congressional seats so we can take the majority in the U.S. House! We also have issues on the ballot including funding for our schools, redistricting reforms, and payday lending reforms.

Overseas voters don't need to request a ballot, but you do need to be registered to vote in Colorado and be sure that you have requested to receive your ballot electronically. Just go to votefromabroad.org, fill in the Federal registration form, print, sign and send it in to your local election office here in Colorado.

On behalf of the Colorado Democratic Party I thank you for your commitment to voting

Democratically yours,
Morgan Carroll
Chair, Colorado Democratic Party

 

Your deadlines are coming up. Don't forget:

REGISTER to vote from abroad by Tuesday, November 6, 7 pm MST. Your registration form will also request your ballot and may be sent by email, fax or postal mail. We recommend registering by email or fax, and requesting that your ballot be delivered to you by email.

RETURN your ballot by Tuesday, November 6 7 pm MST using Colorado's secure online ballot transfer system at https://ballotreturn.sos.colorado.gov (recommended) or by email, fax or postal mail. Your ballot must be submitted by the close of polls on Election Day. If you return your ballot by postal mail, it must be postmarked by Election Day and and received by Wednesday, November 14.

 

All overseas voters may vote in Colorado state and local elections as well as elections for federal offices (US House and US Senate races).

Note: When you fill in your ballot request form, be aware that selecting “I intend to return” rather than “my return is uncertain” may contribute towards establishing yourself as a tax resident in your voting state. Because the legal requirements to establish "residence" or "domicile" for tax purposes are determined by state law and the specific facts of your life, before you note that you intend to return on your form you may consider seeking advice on these matters from your tax professional.


A Message to Utah Voters

Your vote this fall is critically important to Utah! We have a chance to flip dozens of seats STATEWIDE this year but we need your help. We have several races where you can make a difference up and down the ballot, from Box Elder to San Juan County. This year will see huge voter turnout numbers with multiple ballot initiatives focusing where the current republican dominated legislature has failed us, including expanded medicaid, gerrymandering, and medical marijuana. For more information about these elections, please check out Ballotpedia.

Even if you voted from abroad in the past, if you haven't yet requested your ballot this year, you still need to do so to make sure you can vote. Just go to votefromabroad.org, fill in the Federal request form, print, sign and send it in to your local election office here in Utah.

On behalf of the Utah Democratic Party I thank you for your commitment to voting!

In solidarity,
Daisy Thomas
Utah Democratic Party Chair

 

Your deadlines are coming up. Don't forget:

REGISTER to vote from abroad by Tuesday, October 9. Your registration form may be sent by email, fax or postal mail, and it will also request your ballot. We recommend registering by email or fax.

-or-

REQUEST your overseas absentee ballot by Tuesday, October 30. Your request form may be sent by email, fax or postal mail. We recommend sending your request form by email or fax and having your ballot delivered to you by email.

 

RETURN your ballot to your local election office by email or fax by Tuesday, November 6, 8 pm MST. If you return your ballot by postal mail, it must be sent by Monday, November 5 and received by Monday, November 19.

 

All overseas voters may vote in elections for federal offices (US House and US Senate races). Overseas voters who indicate they “intend to return” may also vote in Utah state elections.

Note: When you fill in your ballot request form, be aware that selecting “I intend to return” rather than “my return is uncertain” may contribute towards establishing yourself as a tax resident in your voting state. Because the legal requirements to establish "residence" or "domicile" for tax purposes are determined by state law and the specific facts of your life, before you note that you intend to return on your form you may consider seeking advice on these matters from your tax professional.


A Message to Alabama Voters

Your vote this fall is important to Alabama! Our state is turning blue but we need your help. We have several races where you can make a difference, including Walt Maddox for Governor and Judge Bob Vance for Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court.

Even if you voted from abroad in the past, if you haven't yet requested your ballot this year, you still need to do so to make sure you can vote. Just go to votefromabroad.org, fill in the Federal request form, print, sign and send it in to your local election office here in Alabama.

On behalf of the Alabama Democratic Party I thank you for your commitment to voting!

Democratically yours,
Nancy Worley, Chair
Alabama Democratic Party

 

Your deadlines are coming up. Don't forget:

REGISTER to vote from abroad by Monday, October 22. Your registration form must be sent by postal mail, postmarked by Oct. 22. The registration form will also request your ballot. We recommend that you request to have your ballot delivered to you by email, and that you send your registration/request form asap to ensure you have enough time to return your ballot.

-or-

REQUEST your overseas absentee ballot by Thursday, November 1. Your request form must be sent by postal mail and received by Nov. 1. We recommend that you request to have your ballot delivered to you by email, and that you send your request form asap to ensure you have enough time to return your ballot.

 

RETURN your ballot by Tuesday, November 6. If you request that your ballot be sent by email, you may be able to return your completed ballot by email. Your election official will provide more information with your ballot. Otherwise, your ballot must be sent by postal mail, postmarked by Election Day and received by Tuesday, November 13, 12 noon.

 

All overseas voters may vote in Alabama state and local elections as well as elections for federal offices (US House and US Senate races).

Note: When you fill in your ballot request form, be aware that selecting “I intend to return” rather than “my return is uncertain” may contribute towards establishing yourself as a tax resident in your voting state. Because the legal requirements to establish "residence" or "domicile" for tax purposes are determined by state law and the specific facts of your life, before you note that you intend to return on your form you may consider seeking advice on these matters from your tax professional.


A Message to Minnesota Voters

Your vote this fall is important to Minnesota! To move Minnesota forward, we must win key elections this year, but we need your help.

We have several races where you can make a difference, including re-electing U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar and U.S. Sen. Tina Smith. Please vote and encourage your friends in Minnesota to vote. With Angie Craig running in Congressional District 2 against Jason Lewis and Dean Phillips running in Congressional District 3 against Erik Paulsen, we have our best chance ever to flip these districts from red to blue.

Also, key in Minnesota’s continued success, is to keep the governor’s office in DFL control. Tim Walz, the DFL-endorsed candidate for Governor, and Peggy Flanagan, the DFL-endorsed candidate for Lieutenant Governor, are committed to building “One Minnesota.” Under this vision, all Minnesotans will share in our state’s prosperity. One Minnesota is a place where everyone, regardless of where they live, what look like, or who they love will have a seat at the table and voice in shaping our state’s future.

Even if you voted from abroad in the past, if you haven't yet requested your ballot this year, you still need to do so to make sure you can vote. Just go to votefromabroad.org, fill in the Federal request form, print, sign and send it in to your local election office here in Minnesota.

On behalf of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party, I thank you for your commitment to voting.

Democratically yours,
Ken Martin
Chair, Minnesota DFL

 

Your deadlines are coming up. Don't forget:

REGISTER to vote from abroad by Tuesday, November 6. Your registration form will also request your ballot and may be sent by email, fax or postal mail. We recommend registering by email or fax.

-or-

REQUEST your overseas absentee ballot by Tuesday, November 6. Your request form may be sent by email, fax or postal mail. We recommend sending your request form by email or fax and having your ballot delivered to you by email. Due to delivery time we don’t recommend having it delivered to you by post.

 

RETURN your ballot by Tuesday, November 6, 8 pm CST. Your ballot must be mailed and received by the close of polls on Election Day. Mail your voted ballot early enough for it to reach Minnesota by the deadline. We recommend mailing your ballot by Monday, October 8.

 

All overseas voters may vote in elections for federal offices (US House and US Senate races). Overseas voters who indicate they “intend to return” may also vote in Minnesota state elections.

Note: When you fill in your ballot request form, be aware that selecting “I intend to return” rather than “my return is uncertain” may contribute towards establishing yourself as a tax resident in your voting state. Because the legal requirements to establish "residence" or "domicile" for tax purposes are determined by state law and the specific facts of your life, before you note that you intend to return on your form you may consider seeking advice on these matters from your tax professional.


September Primaries

Massachusetts, Delaware, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, New York

Overseas voters can participate in the 2018 Democratic Primary Elections and impact the ideological direction of the party through the nomination of candidates.

What is on the Primary Ballot

Massachusetts: Tuesday, September 4, 2018 — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Elizabeth Warren) and U.S. House; Statewide office candidates for Governor of Massachusetts (currently Republican Charles D. Baker), Attorney General, Secretary of State, State Senate and House. Massachusetts has a hybrid primary that allows those voters not registered in a party to participate and remain unaffiliated. 

Delaware: Thursday, September 6, 2018 — Federal offices for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Tom Carper) and U.S. House. State offices are Attorney General, State Senate and House. Delaware has a vulnerable Democratic trifecta since 2008.

New Hampshire: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 — Federal office candidates for U.S. House; State office candidates for Governor (sitting governor Republican Chris Sununu is not seeking re-election in 2018), State Senate and House. New Hampshire has a hybrid primary system, that allows unaffiliated voters to choose a party before voting. New Hampshire has a Republican trifecta since 2011

Rhode Island: Wednesday, September 12, 2018 — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse) and U.S. House; Statewide office candidates for Governor (currently Democrat Gina Raimondo) and Lt. Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, State Senate and House. Rhode Island has a hybrid primary that allows unaffiliated voters to choose to affiliate with a party and vote in the primary. Rhode Island has a Democratic trifecta since 2013.

New York: Thursday, September 13, 2018 — State Primary Election will determine candidates for Governor (currently Democrat Andrew Cuomo is seeking a third term) and Lt. Governor of New York, Attorney General, Comptroller, State Senate and State Assembly. The New York Federal Primary was held on June 26, 2018.

 

* Overseas voters from Delaware, New York and Rhode Island who indicate they "intend to return" may vote in New York's state elections.

Hybrid primary – Voters affiliated with a political party can vote in that party's primary, and unaffiliated voters may choose a party primary.

Trifecta – when one political party holds the governorship, a majority in the state senate, and a majority in the state house in a state's government.

 

Questions about the primary?

Take a look at our Primary Elections FAQ.

 

Read more

August 21 - 28 Primaries

Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Guam, Wyoming

Overseas voters can participate in the 2018 Democratic Primary Elections and impact the ideological direction of the party through the nomination of candidates.

Tuesday, August 21 – Alaska and Wyoming
Saturday, August 25 – Guam
Tuesday, August 28 – Arizona and Florida

 

What is on the Primary Ballot

Alaska — Federal office candidates for the U.S. House At-large District. Statewide office candidates for Governor (currently Independent Bill Walker), Lieutenant Governor, State Senate and State House.

Arizona — Federal office candidates for the U.S. Senate (incumbent Republican Jeff Flake not seeking re-election) and U.S. House. Statewide office candidates for Governor (incumbent Depublican Doug Ducey), Secretary of State, Attorney General, Treasurer, Supreme Court, State Senate and State House. Arizona has a Republican state government trifecta since 2009.

Florida — Federal office candidates for the U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Bill Nelson) and U.S. House. Statewide office candidates for Governor (incumbent Republican Rick Scott is term-limited), Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Supreme Court, State Senate and State House

Guam — Candidates for federal non-voting delegate to the U.S. House. Territory office candidates for Governor (incumbent Republican Governor Eddie Baza Calvo is term-limited), Attorney General and all fifteen members of the territorial legislature.

Wyoming — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Republican John Barrasso) and U.S. House At-large District. Statewide office candidates for Wyoming Governor (incumbent Republican Matt Mead is term-limited), Secretary of State, Treasurer, Supreme Court and Wyoming House. Wyoming has a Republican state government trifecta since 2011.

*Overseas voters from Alaska, Arizona and Wyoming who indicate they "intend to return" are eligible to vote in state and local elections.

 

Questions about the primary?

Take a look at our Primary Elections FAQ.

Find dates of other 2018 Primary Elections.

 

Read more

August 11 and August 14 Primaries

Connecticut, Hawaii, Minnesota, Vermont, Wisconsin

Overseas voters can participate in the 2018 Democratic Primary Elections and impact the ideological direction of the party through the nomination of candidates.

Saturday, August 11 – Hawaii 
Tuesday, August 14 – Connecticut, Minnesota, Vermont and Wisconsin State Primaries

 

What is on the Primary Ballot

Connecticut — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Chris Murphy) and U.S. House. Statewide office candidates for Governor (currently Democrat Dan Malloy is not seeking a third term), Attorney General, Secretary of State, State Senate and State House. Connecticut has a Democratic state government trifecta since 2011 rated vulnerable.

Hawaii — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Mazie Hirono) and U.S. House. Statewide office candidates for Governor (incumbent Democrat David Ige), State Senate and State House. Hawaii uses an open primary system. Hawaii has a Democratic state government trifecta since 2010.

Minnesota — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Amy Klobuchar), U.S. House and Special Primary Election for Minnesota's other Senate seat. Statewide office candidates for Governor (incumbent Democrat Mark Dayton), Attorney General, State Secretary of State, State Senate, State House and State Supreme Court. Minnesota uses an open primary system.

Vermont — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Independent Bernie Sanders) and for the state's At-Large Congressional District. Statewide office candidates for Governor (currently Republican Phillip Scott), Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State, State Senate and State House. Vermont uses an open primary system.

Wisconsin — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Tammy Baldwin) and U.S. House. Statewide office candidates for Governor (incumbent Republican Scott Walker), Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, State Secretary of State, State Senate, State Assembly and State Supreme Court. Wisconsin uses an open primary system.

 

* Overseas voters from Connecticut, Minnesota and Wisconsin who indicate they "intend to return" may vote in state and local elections.

Open primary – an election in which registered voters need not be members of a party to vote for the party's nominee.

 

Questions about the primary?

Take a look at our Primary Elections FAQ.

Find dates of other 2018 Primary Elections.

 

Read more

FPCA Protections for Voters Abroad

Why should I send an FPCA as an overseas voter, rather than using a regular in-state absentee ballot request?

We strongly recommend that all overseas voters submit the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) to let your Local Election Official know you are living and voting from abroad. The FPCA is only one page and acts like an address update--but it also provides significant advantages that are only available to overseas voters:

  1. An FPCA sent in the calendar year of an election, protects your ballot at the federal level in case of a recount. (A ballot that doesn't have a corresponding ballot request form may be subject to challenge in a close election).
  2. You will receive a ballot for every election in that calendar year, including primaries, special elections and runoff elections by submitting the single request.
  3. You can use the form to request your blank ballot be sent to you via an electronic option (email, online and/or fax) instead of postal mail. Every state will send a blank ballot electronically.
  4. Your state must send your blank ballot no less than 45 days before the election.
  5. If you don't receive your blank ballot in time to return it in by the deadline, you can use the federal backup ballot, the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB), to cast your vote.
  6. Many states allow overseas voters additional time to return their voted ballot, and some states allow overseas voters to submit voted ballots using an electronic option (email, online and/or fax).

Mark your calendar: for the 2018 Midterm Elections, overseas voters can expect requested blank ballots will be sent by September 22.
 > add 45 Day reminder to your calendar

Why should I send in the FPCA to request my ballot every calendar year?

Under federal law, states are only required to send you a ballot if you submit the form to request it that calendar year, even if you're a registered voter. Some states are more generous and will send blank blllots without an annual request; others are very strict. So we advise all overseas voters to be safe and send an FPCA in each year: the best practice is to send in a new form every January and any time you move. You don't want any unexpected surprises that cause you to miss your chance to vote!

Overseas voters use the FPCA both to register to vote initially and to request a ballot each year. The FPCA is only one page and you can fill it out online at VoteFromAbroad.org (you can create a "Voter Account" to save some of the form information you enter for your future use1). And the one form will cover you for all elections in the calendar year: primary, general and upcoming special elections of which you may not be aware. Here's what you need to do:

  1. Go to www.votefromabroad.org, click on "Start Here" and follow the prompts.
  2. Print out and sign the form.
  3. Return the form to your Local Election Official by mail, email or fax, using information in the Instructions from the website. (The email, phone and fax information is on a separate page from the mailing address.) Submission methods and deadlines vary by state, but please note that you do not need to show a foreign postmark or get a consular stamp.

After you send in your FPCA, be sure to verify with your Local Election Official that they received your application and will be sending a ballot to you. The applicable contact information will be in the printed Instructions, or you can also look up the contact information using the Election Official Directory.

If you have any questions while filling out the form, the website has an online chat box (click the orange circle in the lower right corner of the screen) to contact the Voter Help Desk, or send an email to help@votefromabroad.org.

Only your Local Election Official in the US can accept your voter registration and send out your ballot.

Hint: if you did not received a ballot to vote in your state's 2018 primary election, you most likely will not be getting a ballot to vote in the General Election--UNLESS you submit a new FPCA.

I'm already a registered voter and my state always send me a ballot. Why should I send in the FPCA anyway?

Even though you may vote in a state that typically sends out a ballot without an annual request we still urge all overseas voters to send in their form to request a ballot every year to make sure you will be able to vote. Don't find out too late that you've missed your chance to vote!

And even if you decide not to send in the form this year, it's still very important to email or call your election official to verify that you will be getting a ballot this year. Mistakes happen, states change voting rules--don't wait to find out if your ballot will come--Verify! 

Every election, we hear from voters who find out too late that they won't be able to vote because they missed the deadline to request their ballot.

The most reliable way to verify you will be receiving a ballot this calendar year is to email or call your Local Election Official. You can look up the contact information using the Election Official Directory. Most states also provide online voter registration checks to verify your voter status, but they are not always up-to-date.

Be safe, be sure, be counted!

 

 

1 The VoteFromAbroad.org Voter Account will never store personal identification information such as Social Security number (SSN), driver's license number, Passport number or any such identifier.


August 2 - 7 Primaries

Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, Virgin Islands, Washington State

Overseas voters can participate in the 2018 Democratic Primary Elections and impact the ideological direction of the party through the nomination of candidates.

Thursday, August 2 – Tennessee Primary; Saturday, August 4 – Virgin Islands Territory Primary; Tuesday, August 7 – Kansas, Michigan, Missouri, and Washington State Primaries.

 

What is on the Primary Ballot

Kansas — Federal office candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives. Statewide office candidates for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State and Kansas House of Representatives. Kansas has a Republican state government trifecta since 2010.

Michigan — Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Debbie Stabenow) and U.S. House of Representatives. Statewide office candidates for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Attorney General, Secretary of State and Michigan legislature. Michigan has a Republican state government trifecta since 2010.

Missouri — Missouri uses an open primary system. Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Democrat Claire McCaskill) and U.S. House of Representatives. Statewide office candidates for Missouri legislature. Missouri has a Republican state government trifecta since 2016.

Tennessee — Tennessee uses an open primary system. Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate (incumbent Republican Bob Corker is not seeking re-election) and U.S. House. Statewide office candidates for Governor and Tennessee legislature. Tennessee has a Republican state government trifecta since 2016.

Virgin Islands — Federal nonvoting Congressional Representative. Statewide office candidates for Governor, Lieutenant Governor, the Virgin Islands Legislature and some of the Board of Education and the Board of Elections.

Washington — Washington State uses a top-two primary election. Federal office candidates for U.S. Senate and U.S. House. Statewide office candidates for Washington legislature. Washington has a Democratic state government trifecta since 2016 rated vulnerable.

 

Open primary – an election in which registered voters need not be members of a party to vote for the party's nominee.

Top-two primary – an election in which the top two vote-getters, regardless of their partisan affiliations, advance to the general election. Consequently, it is possible for two candidates belonging to the same political party to win in a top-two primary and face off in the general election.

Trifecta – when one political party holds the governorship, a majority in the state senate, and a majority in the state house in a state's government.

 

Questions about the primary?

Take a look at our Primary Elections FAQ.

Find dates of other 2018 Primary Elections.

 

Read more