San Miguel de Allende

Welcome to Democrats Abroad San Miguel de Allende!

We want our members to know, that we are here in support of our membership and mission, to help U.S. citizens living abroad stay informed and exercise their right to vote and will continue to do so in future U.S. elections. We also offer fun, social events, as well as opportunities to participate as a volunteer each year. Check out our events page HERE!  San Miguel is lucky to have a vibrant, diverse community of active U.S. citizens.

If we can help in any way, please reach out to us!

¡Bienvenido a el San Miguel de Allende Chapter de Democrats Abroad México!

Queremos que nuestros miembros sepan que estamos aquí para ayudar al grupo y su misión - apoyar a ciudadanos americanos en el extranjero a mantenerse informados para que puedan ejercer su derecho al voto. Seguiremos haciendo esto en todas futuras elecciones estadounidenses. También ofrecemos divertidos eventos sociales así como oportunidades para participar como voluntario cada año. Dale clic a la página de eventos AQUÍ!  San Miguel tiene la fortuna de contar con una comunidad vibrante y diversa de dichos ciudadanos americanos.

Si en algo podemos apoyarte, ¡no dudes en contactarnos!

 

    

Hope Bradberry
Chair, San Miguel de Allende
Mexico-SMA@democratsabroad.org

 

 

DA San Miguel de Allende Leadership:

Hope Bradberry
| SMA Chair in 2019-20
Patric Ellsworth
| Chapter Vice Chair 2019-20
Lea Rege
| Chapter Secretary for 2019-20
Gary Belkin
| Chapter Treasurer 2019-2020
See all Leaders


  • News

    Primary Season! Here We Go!

    by Gunnar Erickson

    The US Presidential Election takes place on November 3, 2020.  Without question and regardless of where you stand on the political divide, it is the most important presidential election since Lincoln ran against McClellan in 1862.  Here is the timeline.

    Donald Trump has no serious challenger on the Republican side so he will be renominated and the Republican Convention in Charlotte NC on Aug 24 -27 will be an artfully scripted P.R. event. The Republican presidential primaries will be a steady, heavily promoted triumphant march to the convention.

    The Democrats meanwhile are in total flux.  They chose to have an open and inclusive nomination contest that has lead to a circus of debates with no candidate emerging so far as a consensus candidate.  The next Democratic Presidential debate is on January 14.  There will be others on Feb 7, on February 19 (before the Nevada vote on Feb 19), and on February 25 (before South Carolina vote on Feb 29).  The debates will provide the candidates more exposure albeit in a cramped format and the media will report the losers and winners. 

    But the only thing that counts is selecting voting delegates to the Democratic National Convention on July 13-16 in Milwaukee, and that begins with the Iowa Caucuses on Feb 3.  The Iowa caucuses are not an open vote of all the Democrats in Iowa.  Instead, it is a count of the people who show up at their local designated spot and vote for their preferred candidate. Generally that is a very motivated activist subset of the Iowa Democrats who may or may not represent the general constituency.  Historically a lower percentage of Iowa Democratic voters attend the caucuses than Democrats who vote in other state primaries, but much depends on how hotly contested the contest is.  But because Iowa is the first actual vote, it gets a lot of press attention (which is why the Iowa Democrats fight to vote first).  In 2008 the winner was Barack Obama with 37.6% followed by John Edwards at 29.7 and Hillary Clinton at 29.4. In 2012 the winner was Bernie Sanders with 49.84%, followed by Hillary Clinton at 49.59%.

    The next real vote for delegates takes place in New Hampshire on Feb 11.  It is an actual election.  People go to the polls and cast ballots.  Of the approximately 3979 delegates at the Democratic National Convention, Iowa includes 41 and New Hampshire 24.   But the results of Iowa and New Hampshire historically have created the momentum for Democratic presidential candidates.   

    In 2020,  the Democrats have turned Super Tuesday -  which takes place on March 3 - into a truly super and important event.  California, which has 416 delegates, has moved its primary from after-the-fact June to Super Tuesday.  In addition to California, voters from Alabama (52 delegates), Arizona (67), Colorado (67), Minnesota (75), Massachusetts (91), North Carolina (110), Oklahoma (37), Tennessee (64), Texas (228), Utah (29), Vermont (16), and Virginia (99) will go to the polls. In all, 34% of the Democratic Presidential delegates will be selected.

    March 5th through 7th Democrats Abroad will be holding a worldwide presidential primary.  Democrats Abroad awards 21 delegates to the convention, holding 17 votes, of which 13 are pledged delegates allocated on the basis of the results of the process.    The San Miguel Democrats Abroad chapter will be running that primary here with voting on March 3 and since Mexico has one of the largest group of Democrat voters in Democrats Abroad and since San Miguel has the largest number of members of Democrats Abroad in the county, those votes will matter.

    By the close of Super Tuesday, about 40% of the total votes for the national convention will have been decided.  Other states will have their primaries on a regular basis ending with Washington DC in June.  The biggest of those are March 10 with Idaho (25 delegates), Minnesota (91), Mississippi (41), Missouri (78), Washington (107) and North Dakota (18); March 17 with Arizona (78), Florida (219), Illinois (184), and Ohio (153);  and March 24 with Georgia (120). 

    The US Constitution does not specify the procedure for selection of a party's presidential candidates so it is largely up to the parties of each state.  The Democrats generally use proportional allocation so candidates who receive a minimum percentage of votes, often 15%, divide the pledged delegates in proportion to the percentage of votes they received.  Under a winner-take-all system, sometimes used by Republicans, it is more likely that one candidate can build an overwhelming majority of delegates with primary wins in some big states like California.  Under the Democratic model, it is much more likely that no candidate will have a majority and the delegates will be split.

    If no candidate has an absolute majority of delegates by the time the convention starts on July 13, things will get interesting.  In prior years, the Democrats had a large number of super delegates, which meant that elected members of Congress and other members of the Democratic establishment received votes at the convention outside of the primary system.  The idea apparently was to tamper down the risk of  wild card candidate sweeping the primaries.  That has been changed.  Under the current rules, there are 771 super delegates in addition to the 3979 elected delegates. The super delegates cannot participate in first-ballot voting unless one candidate has cinched it. In that case, they can jump in and make the vote overwhelming. If there is no majority winner after the first ballot, the convention is "contested" and delegates are released to vote for whomever they want. 

    So the Democrats might- or might not-  go into the convention with no candidate having a clear majority.  Assuming there is no early deal where a candidate withdraws and directs her or his delegates to vote for someone else to create a majority candidate, the procedure will be for there to be a first round of voting with all the pledged delegates voting in accordance with their states' primary results.  If there is no outright winner, all bets are off. Just because a state delegate was elected based on a particular candidate's vote, delegates are not forever bound to support that candidate.  If there is no outright winner after the first ballot, the convention is "contested" and delegates are released to vote for whoever they want. Some speculate that the late entries of Deval Patrick and Michael Bloomberg as candidates reflect their belief that there will be a contested convention where either could emerge as the compromise nominee.

    This is the scenario that TV pundits dream of.  Backroom deals, rumors and intrigue come into play under the spotlight.  Amidst whatever wheeling and dealing occurs, the Democrats will continue the voting until eventually a consensus candidate emerges with a majority of the delegate votes.

    The last presidential convention that began with a serious question about who would get the nomination was the 1976 Republican convention that pitted Gerald Ford against Ronald Reagan.  The last multi-ballot Democratic Convention was in 1952 where Adlai Stevenson won on the third ballot.

    It should be an interesting year.

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    Outraged by Gun Violence in the United States? Steps to Take

    By Barbara Erickson

    In the wake of 2 mass shootings in less than 24 hours resulting in the death of at least 31 individuals, many Americans are demanding Majority Leader McConnell recall the Senate for a special session to consider House-passed legislation to require universal background checks. How can you find a voice in this conversation and convert your personal outrage to action? There are concrete steps to take that will make a difference, even though you are in San Miguel.

    First step, what works? I reached out to Julia Pomeroy, long time Chief of Staff for Oregon Congressperson Earl Blumenauer, to find out what I could do that might actually have an impact in Washington. According to Julia, making contact directly with your Member of Congress (MOC) is an effective tool. She relates: “we do track all individual phone calls and emails and give detailed reports to Earl on what people are calling/writing about so that he and the staff can be super responsive to constituents. What we don’t track are online petitions – we get them in the office and since they are random names without addresses or emails, we throw them out.”

    That leads to the next question – how do I identify my MOC? The following sites find them for you and even provide scripts for you to use in case you want them. Alert – the following two sites promote liberal messages: https://5calls.org/issue/expand-background-checks-gun-purchases  and  https://www.callmycongress.com/ Here is one to send a free fax with no agenda: https://faxzero.com/fax_congress.php

    If you want to contact your MOC by email it is simple to google their name to find their congressional site and there you will find a “CONTACT” button to click and write what you want to say. It is important to note that you need to identify yourself as a constituent on all of these platforms to be taken seriously and that you write or call with respect. I personally ask that they respond to my emails as I get satisfaction in knowing they have read my comments.

    Does it make a difference? Emily Ellsworth, a former congressional staffer offers this: "The adage, 'If you're not at the table, you're on the menu' applies to getting in contact with your lawmakers," says Ellsworth. She believes the reason that most people don't contact their representatives is because they think either that their voice doesn't matter or that their representative already knows how constituents feel about an issue. "Neither of these are true," she says. She adds "Calling your representatives means their staff needs to give an answer right away."

    What else works? Donate to effective gun control advocacy organizations such as the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence: https://www.csgv.org.  Ask your friend group to contact their members of congress too, spread the effectiveness. Vote. You can register now at https://vr.votefromabroad.org/  a nonpartisan site.   

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