It’s clear that there aren’t enough people in politics that have a science background (see EPA leadership) or a teaching background. Perhaps we wouldn’t have people disputing climate change if there were more educated people in science leading this country.

What’s being done to get more scientists and engineers into US politics and how can we support those efforts? How many women with a science background are in politics? How are they being supported?

If you are a scientist, engineer or teacher, or know someone who is, urge them to become more involved in politics. They can either run for office (and these organizations will help them) or serve as advisors, speak up at town halls, or host events to inform the public.

Congressional Science & Engineering Fellowships (30 + orgs)

A partner society is a national or international scientific or engineering association that sponsors one or more fellows under the umbrella of the AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships. Societies are typically 501(c)(3) organizations with a majority of members at the doctoral levels who are professionally involved in research or education related to science and engineering. Partner societies conduct their own application and selection processes, and may offer different stipends and support.

Partnership is open to scientific or engineering societies. Partnership is not open to universities or university associations, academic institutions or consortia, trade associations, foundations, or commercial sponsors, or professional societies without a significant focus on science or engineering.

All partner societies agree to sponsor at least one congressional fellow; in addition, they may choose to sponsor an executive or judicial branch fellowship.

AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellowships

Providing opportunities for outstanding scientists and engineers to learn first-hand about federal policymaking while using their knowledge and skills to address today’s most pressing societal challenges.

Eagleton Science and Politics Fellowship Program

Established in 2015, it enables graduate students, post-docs, and faculty to explore intersections between science and politics in order to increase their understanding of how politics affects their disciplines and how they can effectively engage with political and policymaking leaders and institutions. The series highlights the need for improvements in communication between scientists and non-scientists and for expanding the pool of scientifically trained graduates interested in public service careers.

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