News

January 2023 Global Black Caucus Newsletter



Message from the Chair

Democrats Abroad Black History Month: Black Resistance in the Past, Present, and Future

Dear Brothers, Sisters, Allies, and Friends,

I hope 2023 is off to a good start for you! I know that November ’23 and ‘24 feel far away. But, trust me, they’re not. Plus, there are critical elections even sooner on which we need to focus. That’s why it’s essential that we show a SUPER strong Q1 this year. It will demonstrate that we are not letting our foot off the accelerator (I no longer say “gas” in case someone has an EV 😉) and will allow organizations and candidates to keep the momentum building instead of atrophying and having to rebuild later on. Plus – this enables year-round organizing – which is exactly what we need to do to build trust in marginalized and rural communities who don’t want to be used for their vote. Thus, this email covers Actions and Insights to help keep things rolling now and into the future.

Insights: 

  • This blog by Dan Pfeiffer about the Kevin McCarthy Clown Car is great at putting the House investigations in perspective. (I know I keep pointing to Dan Pfeiffer’s Message Box for perspectives on key issues, but why reinvent a wheel when someone else is synthesizing it better than I ever could?!)
  • The Debt-Ceiling: This very straightforward article explains what this is all about. And this Politico article shares the White House’s approach to it (it’s non-negotiable that we need to pay our debts) and the House Republicans. Go JOE!!!
  • This phenomenal NYTimes Opinion piece does a great job enumerating the failure points of the GOP right now (especially compared w/past critiques of the Dems) finishing off with a damning line about McCarthy and the GOP: “a hollow speaker for a hollow party”.



2023 Black History Month theme provided by the Global Black Caucus: Black Resistance in The Past, Present, and Future…

Black history is a living and breathing story of struggle and overcoming. It is both ancient and in process now. It is the summation and multiplication of Black people’s capacity for innovation and the will to survive and thrive in the face of relentless violence against our humanity.

Our story is chronicled over thousands of years of Black existence—beginning with the bones of Dinknesh, the great Mousian library, and the civilizations of Mali, Songhai, Kush, and Aksum. It has been likewise expressed in the untold revolts by those who were enslaved, and Black people’s persistent march toward liberation and freedom.

And, we are making history right now. The largest protest movement in the history of the world was birthed on these shores by our people who have declared that Black lives matter. Black people, and Black women in particular, saving the best prospects for democracy in the last election cycle is yet another testament to this fact.

Placing Black history in this context of past and present affirms that it does not begin with slavery (as this country is wanton to do all too often). This point of departure is also a reminder that history should not be merely relegated to the past, but that in this very moment, we are making history in a way that will impact the kind of future we will have together.

With this level-setting as a backdrop, I’d like to draw your attention to a set of questions that I’ve been reflecting on in the advent of this new year. They are questions that invite us to reflect on our history courageously, be informed and intentional about the decisions before us today, and embrace the idea that what we do now will impact our future together.

Looking back at generations past, what if:

  • African civilizations never encountered European invaders and colonialism?
  • Black people actually received their 40 acres and a mule?
  • Slavery or Jim Crow never happened?
  • Race riots in places like Tulsa, Memphis, Atlanta, and Chicago never happened? FDR made stronger and more explicit provisions for Black folks in the New Deal?
  • The wars on crime and drugs—and the resulting rise of mass incarceration never happened?
  • There was a way to revitalize our neighborhoods without gentrifying them and displacing Black people?
  • The murders of Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, Medgar Evers, Emmitt Till, Sandra Bland, Breonna Taylor, Felycya Harris, Mia Green, George Floyd, Michael Brown, Tamir Rice, and Trayvon Martin never happened—and they were still alive?

Asking these questions in this way not only opens our imagination for what might have happened if people living during these times had chosen to do otherwise.  It also invites those of us who are living in the present to consider the critical choices that are before us now—what they will require of us, their impact, and how people 100 years from now will reflect on what we do in this present moment.  Given this, we are left to consider the ‘what if’s’ of our time. 

What if we:

  • Became a democracy that leads with racial equity and racial justice?
  • Closed racial income and wealth gaps?
  • See poverty (particularly Black poverty) as a systemic and societal failure rather than an indictment on individuals?
  • Embrace a comprehensive reparations program for Black people that redresses America’s history of racism and allows us (and the entire nation) to heal?
  • Convened truth and reconciliation commissions at the national and local levels?
  • Design interlocking systems of education, health, civic participation, and economy that produce racial equity and racial justice?
  • Established a new paradigm for wealth-starting with Black wealth?
  • ALL Black lives really mattered?

And yes we invite you to have the conversations and share the knowledge you gather here with your family and friends, brothers and sisters, allies, or even the stranger sitting next to you on a bench….

 We've put together lists of  activities/events, books, films, and other information we hope you find interesting, inspiring, helpful, and educational on our GBC website.. The resources on this page are intended to help you learn more about African-American History, and GBC issues and help you develop activities and events for your chapter or precinct. 

The Black History Month 2023 Resources page will be regularly updated. 

Where links are provided, they have only suggested sources. Please use the sources you are most comfortable with. 

If you have any questions or ideas you would like us to include, please feel free to contact us at: [email protected]

Love and Light,

Jazz_sig.jpg
Leedonal 'Jazz' Moore

• Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus
• Democrats Abroad Interim Int. Secretary
• DPCA Voting Rep. DACH


 

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January 27, International Holocaust Day

January 27, International Holocaust Day

Home and Belonging

The theme “Home and Belonging” guides Holocaust remembrance and education in 2023. The theme highlights the humanity of the Holocaust victims and survivors, who had their homes and sense of belonging ripped from them by the perpetrators of the Holocaust. The violence of exclusion began with disinformation and hate speech that lent support to systemic injustice, discrimination, and marginalization and ended with genocidal killing. The theme reminds us of our responsibility to respond with humanity to the victims of atrocity crimes, to counter hate speech, antisemitism, Holocaust distortion and denial, and prejudice – to do all we can to prevent genocide.

Be The Light In The Darkness....


#International #HolocaustRemembranceDay #Memory #Home #Belonging #NeverAgain #NeverForget #Educate #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus


Family Trivia for Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Family Trivia for Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Gather with your family and friends - test and share your knowledge.


#Trivia #Quiz #MartinLutherKingJrDay #MLK #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus #CivilRights #IHaveADream


Commemorating Martin Luther King Jr. and The Civil Rights Movement

 

Monday, January 16, 2023, is Martin Luther King Jr. Day and here is why we celebrate this day—plus, information about this influential American, civil rights leader, and Nobel Peace Prize laureate.


How We Observe MLK Day

Americans are often encouraged to observe this day not simply as a day off from work, but also as a “Day of Service” to others through appropriate civic, community, and service projects.

Think of Martin Luther King Jr. Day as an opportunity to give to others in any way you can—whether it’s a community project or simply being kind to others in your community.

Visit www.MLKDay.gov to find Day of Service projects across the country.

Sooner or later all the people of the world will have to discover a way to live together in peace …

–Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)


Remembering Martin Luther King Jr.

Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929. He was a Baptist minister and leader of the civil rights movement, championing justice and equality from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968. As he said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” Dr. King was also a strong advocate of change through nonviolent civil actions based on his Christian values. He was a great speaker, and his powerful words still resonate with us today.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

–Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)


When Is Martin Luther King Jr. Day?

The third Monday in January is Martin Luther King Jr. Day (often abbreviated to “MLK Day”). It has been a federal holiday since 1986. This means that it is an observed holiday for federal employees, as well as for many schools and businesses. This also means that the holiday does not always fall on Martin Luther King Jr.’s true birth date, January 15.

This year, Martin Luther King Jr. Day will be observed on Monday, January 16, 2023.

Year

Martin Luther King Jr. Day

2023

Monday, January 16

2024

Monday, January 15

2025

Monday, January 20


Who Was Martin Luther King Jr.?

Martin Luther King Jr. was born in 1929 in Georgia into a Christian family. His grandfather was a church pastor, his father became a pastor, and then he became a pastor.

We may have all come on different ships, but we’re in the same boat now.

–Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)

After graduating from high school at the age of 15, Martin Luther King went on to receive his B. A. degree in 1948 from Morehouse College. After 3 years of theological study at Crozer Theological Seminary in Pennsylvania, he was elected president of a predominantly white senior class and awarded the B.D. in 1951. After winning a fellowship at Crozer, he enrolled in graduate studies at Boston University, completing his residence for the doctorate in 1953 and receiving the degree in 1955. In Boston, he met and married Coretta Scott, and they started a family.

See more facts about the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr.

In 1954, Martin Luther King Jr. had become pastor of a church in Montgomery, Alabama. Always a strong worker for civil rights, King believed in nonviolence, following Gandhi’s philosophy.

Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men.

–Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)


The Fight Against Segregation

In 1955, he began his struggle to persuade the U.S. government to declare the policy of racial discrimination unlawful. He led the first large nonviolent demonstration against segregated buses. However, racists responded with violence to his nonviolent initiative.

Peace is not merely a distant goal that we seek, but a means by which we arrive at that goal.”

–Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)

In Birmingham, Alabama, in the spring of 1963, King’s campaign to end segregation at lunch counters and in hiring practices drew nationwide attention when the police turned dogs and fire hoses on the demonstrators. King was jailed along with large numbers of his supporters, including hundreds of schoolchildren. His supporters did not, however, include all the black clergy of Birmingham, and he was strongly opposed by some of the white clergy who had issued a statement urging African Americans not to support the demonstrations. From the Birmingham jail, King wrote a letter of great eloquence in which he spelled out his philosophy of nonviolence:

You may well ask: “Why direct action? Why sit-ins, marches, and so forth? Isn’t negotiation a better path?” You are quite right in calling for negotiation. Indeed, this is the very purpose of direct action. Nonviolent direct action seeks to create such a crisis and foster such tension that a community which has constantly refused to negotiate is forced to confront the issue.

In December 1956, the Supreme Court declared bus segregation unconstitutional.

In 1957, King was elected president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He led according to his beliefs from Christianity, with nonviolent influences from Gandhi. He traveled greatly, wrote five books and numerous articles, and led many initiatives to campaign for the proper voter registration of people of color.

Photo: A statue of Dr. King stands at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C.


“I Have a Dream”

On August 28, 1963, King directed a march of 250,000 demonstrators to Washington, D.C., where he gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, delivered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

Martin Luther King Jr. dreamed that the inhabitants of the United States would be judged by their personal qualities and not by the color of their skin:

“I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed, ‘We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.’”

The following year, President Johnson signed a law prohibiting all racial discrimination. 

Photo: President Johnson signing the 1964 Civil Rights Act on July 2, 1964, in Washington D.C. as Martin Luther King, Jr., and others look on. 

In 1964, Martin Luther King Jr. was awarded Nobel Peace Prize at the young age of 35 for his peaceful campaign against racism. He turned over the prize money of $54,123 to support the civil rights movement. Here is his acceptance speech.

Peace is more precious than diamonds or silver or gold.”

–Martin Luther King Jr. (1929–68)

On April 4, 1968, King was assassinated by a racist while speaking in Tennessee in support of the struggling garbage workers of that city. It had been only 4 years earlier that he had received the Nobel Peace Prize for his nonviolent campaign against racism.


#MartinLutherKingJrDay #MLK #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus #CivilRights #IHaveADream








First Seat Flipped in 2023!

Congratulations

Aaron Rouse wins the Virginia Special Election! Seat flipped! 


#Senator #AaronRouse #VADems #DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus  #VirginaBeachSpecialElection #VoteFromAbroad #SeatFlipped #BlackVotesMatter #BlackRepresentationMatters  


Happy New Year!

Dear Brothers, Sisters, Allies, and Friends,
 
May 2023 be filled with good health, joy, laughter, and above all love, compassion, empathy, and shared knowledge.
 
2023 gives us a great opportunity to ready up for the 2024 Presidential Elections, which we can only win by uniting and including all willing and eligible American Voters Living Abroad in all corners of the world.
 
United We Are. United We Stand. United We Win!
 
Huge Thank You to the entire Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus Team, Democrats Abroad, and ALL our Volunteers and generous Donors for everything you have done in 2022.
 
In 2023, let’s continue to stand up for our rights and continue to save and uphold our democracy.
 
Together, We Can!
 
Love and Light,
Your GBC

 



December 2022 Global Black Caucus Newsletter



Message from the Chair

Democrats Abroad Black Caucus Happy Holidays!

Dear Brothers, Sisters, Allies, and Friends,

The Global Black Caucus is wishing you Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year. May good health, peace, and the joy of the holidays be with you, today and throughout the new year.

I want to use the momentum of our highest gratitude to all our Volunteers and Supporters, our domestic and international Collaborators, and all Democrats Abroad Volunteers who all share the same mission and passion of Getting Out The Vote and fighting for upholding our Fundamental Rights To Vote!

Please read our final statement of 2022 on the Respect For Marriage Act.

Whilst 2022 is nearly at an end, our GBC mission continues to advocate on issues on behalf of our African-American Brothers, Sisters, and Allies.

Please know that you are not alone. Our GBC Community is made up of strong, diverse, and supportive members from all around the world who are always there for each other and hear one out, and if you do feel alone and would like to exchange some thoughts, you may always drop us an email: [email protected]

Love and Light,

Jazz_sig.jpg
Leedonal 'Jazz' Moore

• Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus
• Democrats Abroad Interim Int. Secretary
• DPCA Voting Rep. DACH


 

Read more

Happy Kwanzaa! Habari Gani?

Happy Kwanzaa!

Habari Gani?

Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration honoring African heritage in African American culture and takes place from December 26th to January 1st.  All Seven Principles of #Kwanzaa are inspiring, uplifting, positive, and centered on traditions of the African harvest season. In fact, the name Kwanzaa comes from the #Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning “first fruits of the harvest.“

Can you list all 7 principles of Kwanzaa?

The “Nguzo Saba” or as it translates from Swahili to English as “The Seven Principles of Kwanzaa” is a value system and set of principles which outlines the mission statement and intentions of Kwanzaa.

Kwanzaa founder Dr. Maulana Karenga describes the principles as “…the core and consciousness of Kwanzaa. They are posed as the matrix and minimum set of values African Americans need to rescue and reconstruct their life in their own image and interest and build and sustain an Afrocentric family, community and culture.”

The Nguzo Saba are listed as:

🔴🕯Umoja (Unity)
⚫️🕯Kujichangulia (Self-Determination)
🔴🕯Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)
⚫️🕯Ujaama (cooperative economics)
🔴🕯Nia (purpose)
⚫️🕯Kuumba (creativity)
🔴🕯Imani (faith)

During Kwanzaa someone will informally ask, “Habari Gani?” or “What's happening?” in Swahili throughout the day. Somone will respond with the principle for the day, which today is “Umoja” which translates into English as “Unity”. To learn more about Kwanzaa’s history, cultural expressions, and to find fun activities for new families & children, as well as more information on the 7 principles, join our virtual Kwanzaa celebration: nmaahc.si.edu/kwanzaa


#Unity #Umoja#DemsAbroad #GlobalBlackCaucus #HabariGani #Mazao #Mkeka #Muhindi #Kinara #MishumaaSaba#KikombeChaUmoja #Zawadi #HappyKwanzaa


Happy Holidays

The Global Black Caucus is wishing you Happy Holidays and a Happy New Year.

May good health, peace, and the joy of the holidays be with you, today and throughout the new year. 🙏🏾💙

We also would like to use the momentum of our highest gratitude to all our Volunteers and Supporters, our domestic and international Collaborators, and all Democrats Abroad Volunteers whom all share the same mission and passion of Getting Out The Vote and fighting for upholding our Fundamental Human Rights! 🙏🏾💙

Please read our final statement of 2022 on the Respect For Marriage Act here: Statement

Whilst 2022 is nearly at an end, our GBC mission continues to advocate on issues on behalf of our African-American Brothers, Sisters, and Allies.

Please know that you are not alone. Our GBC Community is made up of strong, diverse, and supportive members from all around the world who are always there for each other and hear one out, and if you do feel alone and would like to exchange some thoughts, you may always drop us an email: [email protected]

Love and Light,


Leedonal 'Jazz' Moore 

Chair Democrats Abroad Global Black Caucus


#HappyHolidays #ThankYou #Voters #Volunteers #DemsAbroad #Democrats #GlobalBlackCaucus #HappyNewYear #LoveAndLight


Global Black Caucus Chair Moore's Statement on the Respect for Marriage Act

 

The Respect for Marriage Act ensures that not only same-sex marriages but also interracial marriages are enshrined in federal law.

The Supreme Court overturning the 1973 Roe v. Wade ruling legalizing abortion reminds all of us, that whatever rights we have in this society are conditional — they can be taken away, and the fact that Congress had to take up this issue in 2022 should be a stark reminder of that fact for us.

The Respect for Marriage Act, which passed the Senate last week, had been picking up steam since June when the Supreme Court overturned the federal right to an abortion. That ruling included a concurring opinion from Justice Clarence Thomas that suggested the high court should review other precedent-setting rulings, including the 2015 decision legalizing same-sex marriage.

While much of the attention has been focused on protections for same-sex marriages, interracial couples are glad Congress also included protections for their marriages, even though their right to marry was well-established decades ago.

It’s a little unnerving that these things where we made such obvious progress are now being challenged or that we have to beef up the bulwark to keep them in place.

So many of those things that have just been taken for granted ... are under threat.

But why is Loving v. Virginia so significant? 

One day in the 1970s, Paul Fleisher and his wife were walking through a department store parking lot when they noticed a group of people looking at them. Fleisher, who is white, and his wife, who is Black, were used to “the look.” But this time it was more intense.

“There was this white family who was just staring at us, just staring holes in us,” Fleisher recalled.

That fraught moment occurred even though any legal uncertainty about the validity of interracial marriage had ended a decade earlier—in 1967 when the U.S. Supreme Court struck down state laws banning marriages between people of different races.

In more than half-century since interracial marriage has become more common and far more accepted. So Fleisher was surprised that Congress felt the need to include additional protection in the Respect for Marriage Act, which was given final approval in a House vote Thursday. It ensures that not only same-sex marriages but also interracial marriages are enshrined in federal law.

The 74-year-old Fleisher, a retired teacher and children’s book author, attended segregated public schools in the 1950s in the then-Jim Crow South and later saw what he called “token desegregation” in high school when four Black students were in his senior class of about 400 students.

He and his wife, Debra Sims Fleisher, 73, live outside Richmond, about 50 miles from Caroline County, where Mildred Jeter, a Black woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, were arrested and charged in 1958 with marrying out of state and returning to Virginia, where interracial marriage was illegal. Their challenge to the law led to Loving v. Virginia, the landmark ruling that ended bans against interracial marriages.